Will COVID-19 have a second peak? Yes, and WHO warns it could come sooner than you think

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“We cannot make assumptions that just because the disease is on the way down now it is going to keep going down,” WHO’s Dr. Mike Ryan warns. It’s generally accepted among scientists and infectious disease experts that large pandemics often come in waves . There’s the first wave, which is the original widespread outbreak, followed by an interval of declining infections, only to see the rate of infection skyrocket months later—the infamous “second wave.” Read Full Story

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How the disease detectives on front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic track an outbreak

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The health workers who raced to try to track the virus before it exploded are trained by the CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service. With any infectious disease, finding out how the pathogen spreads and who has been exposed is a crucial part of the health response. Across the country, as the coronavirus outbreak grows, disease detectives are on those front lines, investigating the threat, tracking down those who may have come into contact with a COVID-19 infected person, and collecting as much data on this novel illness as possible. And before they go out into the field, these disease detectives are trained at the CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service Program. Read Full Story

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6 takeaways from Anthony Fauci’s Senate testimony, from vaccine timelines to second waves

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Fauci began with a warning on the dangers of reopening the country prematurely. This morning the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee convened, with masked officials on Capitol Hill and remote video calls from witnesses, in a high-profile hearing on plans to restart the U.S. economy post-COVID-19. Four leading government doctors testified, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, who has emerged as an icon of national guidance during the pandemic. Read Full Story

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Look at the West Coast’s apocalyptic hell sky

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As wildfires rage up and down the western seaboard, people in California and Oregon woke up to an eerie, orange-tinted world. Fires have been burning in California for weeks, and a new heat wave and strong winds over Labor Day weekend sparked several more across the state and in Oregon. With those fires has come intense, thick smoke affecting the region’s air quality (San Francisco has had 23 straight days of warnings about bad air ), but the amount of smoke in the sky on September 9 reached a new level, blocking the sun and creating a disturbing orange-hued world. Read Full Story

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Coronavirus symptoms: How long do they take to show up? New research paints a fuller picture

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Individuals infected with COVID-19 could be symptom-free for 5 to 11 days, making it more likely they unknowingly spread the disease. New research published in the Annals of Internal Medicine has cast a clear light on the median incubation period of the COVID-19 coronavirus. The researchers examined news reports about the spread of the virus outside of China as well as interviewed people outside of China who became infected with the disease, and from that extrapolated the time frame the coronavirus is likely to infect someone without a person showing symptoms. Read Full Story

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Humans can now infect their pets with the coronavirus

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A pet dog, a Pomeranian, has tested positive for the virus after its owner came down with the disease in Hong Kong. If you’ve got the coronavirus or think you may have it, you’re probably following the recommended precautions of self-isolating from your friends and family. But now it appears that infected people need to isolate themselves from their pets as well. That’s because Hong Kong has reported its first human-to-animal transmission of the coronavirus. Read Full Story

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Gates Foundation, WHO hacks are part of a growing wave of attacks on science and health officials

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Attacks against public health workers all over the world are on the rise, even in the U.S., where lockdown protesters have heckled the very nurses and doctors risking their lives to save ours. A trove of email addresses and passwords of World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Gates Foundation employees has been circulating among far-right neo-Nazi groups, reports Vice . But the circulation of that personal data is just the latest in a wave of growing attacks on science and health officials who are working to fight the spread of COVID-19 across the globe. Read Full Story

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The best thing about Jerry Seinfeld’s ‘NYC is not dead’ article is this cab driver’s response

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Is New York City ever coming back? Perhaps you have seen the recent debates about New York City and whether it will ever bounce back from the coronavirus pandemic. The global center of culture, commerce, and finance has been a shell of its former self since a wave of shutdown orders and COVID-19 infections swept through the five boroughs earlier this year. Read Full Story

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