Why Chobani is giving its workers the vaccine at its factory

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Workers at the yogurt company’s Twin Falls, Idaho, plant don’t have to go anywhere or make complicated appointments to get their shots. They’ll happen right at work. When employees at the Chobani plant in Twin Falls, Idaho, come to work on March 25 and April 1, they can get a COVID-19 vaccine for free. The company, which already gave its employees up to six hours paid time off to get vaccinated, has now partnered with the city’s Department of Health and a local pharmacy to distribute shots on-site at two vaccination events. Read Full Story

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Sanofi and CVS are building COVID-safe flu vaccination stations

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Flu season is nearly upon us. Here’s how you can get a flu shot without worrying about going into the doctor’s office. The upcoming flu season threatens to add further complication to an already raging pandemic. That’s why French pharmaceutical company Sanofi is working with CVS to create walk-up and drive-through vaccination stations to inoculate people against the flu. Read Full Story

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The Gates Foundation is giving $1.6 billion to ensure people get all the other vaccines they need too

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The donation will help ensure that diseases such as polio, yellow fever, and measles don’t spread as the world focuses attention and funding on the coronavirus. As the Gates Foundation works to help pharmaceutical companies scale up factories to make a COVID-19 vaccine before a vaccine is ready—knowing that’s the only way we will be prepared to quickly make enough doses for the entire world—it’s also trying to ensure that existing vaccines such as those for polio and measles don’t fall behind because of the pandemic. Read Full Story

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This map shows what’s slowing down the vaccine rollout where you live

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A variety of factors—from poor healthcare systems to low internet access to vaccine hesitancy—will keep people from getting the vaccine. This map shows where those issues will need to be addressed to end the pandemic. More than two months after the first COVID-19 vaccine was approved in the U.S. and healthcare workers began getting shots, only around 14% of the population has gotten at least one dose. At the current rate of around 1.5 million jabs per day, it will take until next February for 90% of Americans to be vaccinated. Read Full Story

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How Salesforce has helped plant 10 million new trees (with 90 million to go)

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The company is working on its commitment to plant 100 million trees, with some valuable lessons about how forest restoration can be most effectively deployed. In Madagascar, where 90% of the country’s forests have been lost to deforestation, the tech company Salesforce is working with a nonprofit to pay workers to plant and protect 10 million trees. In Australia, it’s paying to restore 150,000 native trees on degraded farmland. In Latin America, it’s funding more than 600,000 new trees in six countries in the Andes. In Tanzania, it’s helping fund the natural regeneration of 800,000 trees. In areas destroyed by wildfire in California, it’s helping support work to replace thousands of trees with species that will be less likely to burn in the next fire . Read Full Story

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The surprising reason tobacco plants could solve one of the COVID-19 vaccine’s biggest hurdles

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In the race to manufacture billions of doses of vaccines, could plants be a secret ingredient? For the past 80 years, eggs have been a main ingredient in vaccines for measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox, the flu, and others. Typically, modified genetic material from a virus is inserted into an egg’s proteins, and those proteins are then introduced into the human body to “teach” it an immune response. But since each egg must be modified individually, the lag time for egg-based vaccines can literally be a killer. In the U.S., for example, the CDC must predict in January what strains of the flu will erupt nearly a year later, to give drugmakers time to manufacture enough inoculations. A handful of companies, however, are pioneering vaccines developed in plants, which can be grown and treated in bulk. Using a cousin of the tobacco plant ( nicotiana benthamiana ), biomedical companies Kentucky …

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