What the office lunch hour will look like when we return to work

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Expect big, pandemic-driven changes to corporate dining services and other perks when things reopen. Your beloved buffet? Gone. The microwave may be, too. As states enter later phases of reopening and offices start to turn their lights back on, many changes are in the works to keep employees safe and minimize the transmission of COVID-19. One area in particular that’s undergoing an evolution is corporate dining. Gone may be the days of the grease-splattered communal microwave, heavily fingerprinted water cooler, and shared refrigerator where leftovers go to die. In their place, fresh protocols, setups, and technologies are helping companies adapt their corporate dining and food and beverage perks (like complimentary snacks and coffee) to a new, safer world—without losing the benefits that those things have long brought to workplaces. Read Full Story

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A Marketer’s Guide to Working Remotely

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Remote work is going from an occasional perk to the norm. As long as you have a computer and internet connection, you can perform your job anytime, anywhere. For marketers, creating promotional materials, meeting clients, and completing projects from home, hotel, coffee shop, library—basically anywhere with an internet connection. While working remotely has many benefits, employees who regularly worked in the office may have a difficult time making the transition to exclusively working this way. In this article, we’ll talk about the how’s and why’s of remote work for marketers. The Rise in Popularity of Working Remotely Remote work has been around for years. However, the COVID-19 pandemic made it unexpectedly the norm for many businesses, and both employers and employees are realizing the work-from-home system can be successful. According to Global Workplace Analytics , big companies like Best Buy, British Telecom, Dow Chemical found remote workers are 35 percent …

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Why “flexibility” may be the least helpful thing companies can offer working parents right now

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Companies have piled on the perks for parents who are working from home during the pandemic. They should have been focused on systemic change. Over Labor Day weekend, real estate mogul Rob Speyer got a call from an old friend: Michael Mulgrew, president of the United Federation of Teachers, the union that represents New York City’s 75,000-plus educators. Mulgrew had a favor to ask. Could Speyer, through his role as president and CEO of Tishman Speyer, help monitor and improve ventilation in some of the city’s public schools, as he had done across his own commercial real estate portfolio? Good ventilation could reduce the spread of COVID-19 in enclosed spaces like classrooms—and lay the foundation for reopening the schools that serve New York City’s 1.1 million students. Read Full Story

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This Seattle restaurant is redesigning its entire business model in response to the coronavirus

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‘There are two things that haven’t changed: People need to eat and people need to work.’ Canlis is one of Seattle’s top fine-dining restaurants, with a storied history and panoramic views of Lake Union. But Washington state — and King County in particular — are at the epicenter of the coronavirus crisis, so owners Mark and Brian Canlis knew they needed to rethink their business if they were going to stay afloat when fine dining is the last thing on anyone’s mind. Read Full Story

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I run Google TV. Here are my secrets for leading a team remotely

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Remote work isn’t going away when the pandemic ends. Here’s how to get the most out of it and avoid pitfalls along the way. Even before COVID-19 led people to turn their dining rooms into makeshift offices, remote work was on the rise. Perhaps unsurprisingly, many businesses have found that remote work makes it increasingly difficult to preserve their company culture. After all, perks such as childcare, happy hours, and social lunches don’t mean much if you’re not on-site. What’s more, remote work has the potential to throttle the kind of free-flowing collaboration and brainstorming that happens when people are in the same space. Read Full Story

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What to do if you’re not ready to go back to the office yet

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Some offices are reopening, but if you’re feeling worried about returning, you’re not alone. Various areas of the country are reopening after COVID-19 forced much of the country to either work from home or apply for unemployment benefits. As more companies make plans for employees to return to the office, a new Korn Ferry survey indicates that employees might not be ready. Half of those surveyed are afraid for their health , even though 75% think their companies will do a good job providing a safe workplace. Less than one in three (32%) say it’s “highly likely” that they will head back to their desks when the office reopens. Read Full Story

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Cardlytics’ spend report shows consumer spending beginning to recover

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30-second summary: To address the uncertainty around consumer spending in the age of COVID-19, ClickZ hosted a Peer Network webinar with Michael Akkerman, the Chief Product & Strategy Leader at Cardlytics. Through their ad platform, Cardlytics has visibility into half of all card swipes in the continental US. This gives the company a complete view into more than $3 trillion in consumer spending each year and is the basis for their State of Spend report. Weekly monitoring revealed spending from March through the end of April was in decline, reaching a max decline of about 35% across all retail categories. By the end of April, Cardlytics to see the trend in declining spend begin to decrease, with spending down about 21% at the end of April and down about 14% as of this past week. Grocery purchasing has fueled some of this recovery, with grocery prices increasing by about 3% …

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Corporate diversity is shrouded in secrecy. It doesn’t have to be

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A new index and coalition that shines a spotlight on inclusion is key to lasting change, says Intel’s chief diversity and inclusion officer. Everyone is carrying things you can’t see and working through challenges that may not be voiced. For me, it is navigating obstacles as a Black family and a parent of a Black adult male son in America. As a mother, I am constantly thinking of my son’s safety and ensuring his place in this world is aligned to his greatness and not held up by artificial barriers such as skin color. How do I lead and influence in a way that protects him as a human being? I also think about the world I brought my son into, and how it needs to be much better than the world I grew up in. Read Full Story

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