41 states have reduced their carbon emissions while growing their economies

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It’s possible for the U.S. to decouple emissions growth from economic growth. The U.S. needs a massive economic boost to recover from the coronavirus crisis, but how that boost happens will be crucial not just to the economy, but to the climate. A green COVID-19 recovery will create jobs and make the country even more resilient against a volatile future. This might sound like an impossible demand to put on the much-needed recovery, but in recent years most states have already shown that this is economically possible. Since 2005, 41 states and Washington, D.C., have increased their GDPs while reducing their carbon emissions, debunking the myth that economic growth can only happen at the expense of our environment. Read Full Story

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Who’s hiring right now? These companies have entry-level jobs openings and internships

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LinkedIn data shows there are more than 1.5 million entry-level jobs and 65,000 internships in the U.S. currently. You know you’re facing an unprecedented economic tsunami when the number of jobs lost in one month alone is in the tens of millions. Thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are not only looking at an extraordinary loss of life but the fallout from businesses shuttering across the country and the world. Nevertheless, some experts are pointing to signs that a recovery may be closer than we know. Read Full Story

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Corn Trades Higher, COVID Economic Impacts

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Turner’s Take: COVID economic impacts, Corn trades higher, CBOT up again on global weather concerns Q1 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more “The U.S. economic recovery pace accelerated between February and April as COVID vaccinations increased and consumers returned to travel and other entertainment options,” reports Daniels Trading Senior Commodities Broker Craig Turner, author of Turner’s Take […]

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The coronavirus is exposing how vital stable housing is to healthcare

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The economic crisis threatens to undermine the already fragile housing situation of millions. That’s going to make preventing further spread (and a future recovery) much more difficult. Housing is more than a basic need—it’s a key part to healthcare. Amid the economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic, that aspect of healthcare is both more needed and more precarious than ever. There are already nearly 10 million very low-income renter households across the U.S., and another 1.5 million will become very or extremely low income as a result of the coronavirus crisis and the subsequent financial fallout, according to an estimate from the National Low Income Housing Coalition—adding stress to an already stressed housing system, and further highlighting that link between housing and health. Read Full Story

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Forget U or V or W: We may be headed toward a K-shaped recovery

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The lack of further stimulus aid from the government could create more and more divergence between our society’s “haves” and “have-nots.” U, V, W. Most of the forecasts for economic recovery thus far are named for letters that match their shape on graphs of economic indicators. But a new letter is entering the vocabulary of economists and politicians of late, as economic troubles drag on due to a lack of additional government cash relief: K-shaped recovery. Read Full Story

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U-shaped or V-shaped recovery? Here’s your guide to the geometry of recessions

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Some scenarios for what our economic recovery might look like are scarier than others. We’ll help you digest the economic alphabet soup. The coronavirus crisis stands to go down in history as an unwelcome sequel to the Great Depression, as its economic destruction readies to dwarf that of 2008’s Great Recession. But even the worst of times won’t last forever, and economists are now weighing in on how a recovery will look. Read Full Story

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Even during COVID-19, states, cities, and businesses are making progress on a climate-friendly future

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Continued ambitious climate action by U.S. entities could reduce emissions up to 37% by 2030. Despite the brief respite from emissions caused by COVID-19 lockdowns, it hasn’t been clear whether the pandemic will actually set the world on course to a more climate-friendly future. There’s the issue of disposable personal protective equipment polluting the oceans , the rise in single-use plastics amid coronavirus fears, and the concern that car traffic will increase as people avoid public transit. More broadly, there’s the risk that policy leaders will double down on fossil fuels as part of our economic recovery, rather than divest from them. Read Full Story

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