We’re already past critical climate tipping points. Here’s why we still need to cut emissions now

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If we can keep the earth’s temperature low enough, the effects of what’s coming won’t be as disastrous—even if they’re inevitable. If every country in the world cuts global greenhouse gas emissions to zero by the end of the century—or even if they managed to do it by the end 2020—the planet would still keep warming for hundreds of years, says a new study. Researchers found that humans would have had to stop all emissions sometime between 1960 and 1970 to stop the global temperature and sea levels from continuing to rise. Read Full Story

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The planet is full of land holding ‘irrecoverable carbon’—and it’s at risk

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If we keep cutting down trees or destroying marshes, it won’t matter how many emissions we stop: The planet won’t be able to reabsorb the carbon we’ve released in time. Fossil fuels get the most attention in the fight to reduce carbon emissions, but preserving nature is also critical. Even if we drastically cut our emissions, it won’t do much good if we release the carbon that’s stored in living plants and soil. How much carbon is that? A new study found that there are more than 260 billion tons of carbon in “living carbon reserves,” including mangrove forests and peatlands, that are at risk of being lost. If it’s released now, planting trees won’t recapture it quickly enough for the world to reach the target of zero net emissions by 2050. Read Full Story

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This Al Gore-supported project uses AI to track the world’s emissions in near real-time

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“We intend to trace all significant manmade greenhouse gas emissions and assign responsibility for them.” As the world tries to figure out how to flatten the climate curve—cutting global emissions in half by the end of the decade, and reaching net-zero emissions by the middle of the century—one challenge is how to track current emissions from every power plant, farm, and other source on the planet. A new project called the Climate TRACE Coalition plans to use satellite imagery and AI to track those emissions in near real-time, even if they’re not being reported by the source. Read Full Story

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We need major air-conditioner innovation to keep us cool without warming the planet

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Building more efficient AC and refrigerators could prevent the equivalent of eight years of global emissions over the next four decades. Climate change is causing our planet to get warmer and warmer , and as we all crank up our air conditioners in response to sweltering temperatures , we’re actually worsening global warming, paradoxically making it more hot as we try to stay cool. More ACs and refrigerators mean more greenhouse gases emitted into our atmosphere and more energy required to run them. And as more people in the developing world enter the middle class, they’re buying more air conditioners, exacerbating the problem even more. Read Full Story

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Companies that set science-based climate targets are cutting emissions faster than expected

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An analysis of more than 300 companies found good news: So far, targets designed to avoid worst-case global warming scenarios are getting results. For years, companies would announce plans to cut emissions using goals that seemed to be picked more because they were round numbers. In 2015, an initiative started to have companies use “ science-based targets, ” which were designed to lower emissions at rates needed to curb global warming. But while many companies signed up, it wasn’t clear how quickly they would take action. Similar goals haven’t always worked well—more than 150 companies pledged to end deforestation by 2020 and then failed to actually meet that goal. But a new analysis suggests that the Science Based Targets initiative is working. Read Full Story

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5 years after the Paris climate agreement, the world is far off track of its goals

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On the anniversary of the landmark global climate deal, we can see the path to limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius—but we’re not remotely far enough down it. It’s been five years since the world’s leaders met in Paris and hammered out the terms of the Paris Agreement, the landmark climate deal with the goal to cut emissions quickly enough to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. Since then, solar power has become the cheapest form of electricity in history . Countries like China and the U.K. have committed to reach net-zero emissions. But the world is still very far from on track to actually addressing global warming. Read Full Story

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Some Georgia business owners face an existential dilemma: Reopen now or maybe never

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With Governor Kemp’s controversial move to let businesses reopen, some entrepreneurs say they have to take their chances or close. To make sure his Atlanta-based hair salon was ready for its big reopening this weekend, Steve Hightower pulled out all the stops. The chairs were moved 10 feet apart. The communal table is gone. All appointments are being spaced out. Guests are prohibited from bringing friends or spouses or even children. Employees will wear masks and gloves, and temperature checks are mandatory. And if you’re still not convinced that the 1,500-square-foot storefront is properly safeguarded against viral incursion, Hightower even posted an extensive Facebook video tour to make customers feel more comfortable about coming in for cuts. Read Full Story

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Marketing in Times of Uncertainty - Whiteboard Friday

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Posted by randfish Our work as marketers has transformed drastically in the space of a month. Today, we're grateful to welcome our good friend Rand to talk about a topic that's been on the forefront of our minds lately: how to do our jobs empathetically and effectively through one of the most difficult trials in modern memory. We hope you've got a cozy seat in your home office, a hot mug of coffee from your own kitchen Keurig, and your cat in your lap as you join us for this week's episode of Whiteboard Friday. Video Transcription Howdy, folks. I'm Rand Fishkin, founder of Moz and co-founder of Sparktoro. And I'm here today with a very special edition of Whiteboard Friday. I think that now is the right time to talk about marketing in uncertain epochs like the one we're living through. We obviously have a global crisis. It's very …

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The Best-Laid Plans: Can We Predict Anything About 2021?

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Posted by Dr-Pete I've deleted this introduction twice. To say that no one could've predicted how 2020 unfolded seems trite since we're not even a month into 2021, and this new year has already unraveled. Our challenges in the past year, across the globe, have gone far beyond marketing, and I doubt any of us ended the year the way we expected. This graph from Google Trends tells the story better than I can: The pandemic fundamentally rewrote the global economy in a way none of us has ever experienced, and yet we have to find a path forward. How do we even begin to chart a course in 2021? What do we know? Let's start small. Within our search marketing realm, is there anything we can predict with relative certainty in 2021? Below are some of the major announcements Google has made and trends that are likely to continue. …

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How to tell if a company’s ‘net zero’ goals are serious—or just greenwashing

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Here are some questions to ask when a company says it plans to get to zero emissions. The number of companies that have set net-zero climate goals—meaning that they’ll cut their CO2 emissions as much as possible, and any they still emit will be offset by projects that capture carbon—has more than tripled over roughly the last year. Nestlé, the world’s largest food company, says that it plans to reach net-zero emissions by 2050. Unilever, another consumer product giant with hundreds of brands, plans to get there by 2039 . Duke Energy, the North Carolina-based electric utility with a long history of using coal, plans to reach net zero by 2050. Even oil companies such as BP now say that they are aiming for the same thing. Others, including Amazon and Microsoft , plan to hit the goal much sooner. Read Full Story

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Hundreds of big American brands are asking Biden to commit to cutting emissions 50% by 2030

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Apple, Google, Microsoft, Coca-Cola, Walmart, Nike, Levi Strauss, Salesforce, and more are trying to push the administration to set bolder emissions goals. After rejoining the Paris agreement , the U.S. now has to set new goals to cut greenhouse gas emissions, and Biden will announce the details of the commitment within days, before an Earth Day summit. Scientists are pushing for the goal of reducing emissions by 50% by the end of the decade to be on track for net-zero emissions by the middle of the century. That means sweeping changes, but experts say it’s feasible—and now hundreds of American companies are advocating for the same thing. Read Full Story

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