Trump vs. Twitter: Is there a silver lining in the Section 230 fight?

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Stripping tech platforms of liability protection could unleash a new wave of innovation, argues Bradley Tusk. There are a lot of words being thrown around in the fight between Twitter and President Donald Trump. Bias. Censorship. Responsibility. Liability. Interference. Immunity. But there’s one word not being mentioned nearly enough: opportunity. Read Full Story

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New Biden campaign ad fights Trump BS fire with Trump BS fire

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In response to President Trump using Dr. Fauci’s words out of context, the Biden campaign did some selective quoting of Trump himself. One of the most common new hobbies over the past four years has been for critics of President Trump to retweet his old tweets that directly contradict something he’s said or done on any given day. There’s always a tweet, right? Last month, the Biden campaign used a 10-second clip of President Trump during a rally speech saying, “If I lose to him, I don’t know what I’m going to do. I will never speak to you again . . . . You’ll never see me again.” Read Full Story

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10 ways social media platforms can fight election disinformation

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The First Amendment protects freedom of speech, but that doesn’t mean the major platforms have to guarantee bad actors freedom of reach. Approaching the U.S. presidential election, social media platforms have been feverishly introducing new measures to curb disinformation. Twitter announced the suspension of all political advertising, the addition of warning labels on tweets containing misleading information and their deamplification, and limits to how users can retweet. Facebook also announced the suspension of political advertising (though much later). In September it started taking down and labeling posts that tried to dissuade people from voting. Both platforms have started aggressively banning QAnon. They have also removed or labeled some posts by President Trump containing false information and declared that they would take down any content attempting to wrongly claim election victory. YouTube, despite being a key platform of misinformation, has remained fairly quiet. Read Full Story

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The Trump administration plans to execute more people during a lame-duck period than any other president

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Despite the high-profile fight to stop the death of Brandon Bernard, Trump plans to execute three more people before the inauguration. On December 10, as the scheduled execution for Brandon Bernard ran late, people took to Twitter for last-minute attempts to convince the government to exonerate him. Tweets noting that “Brandon Bernard has not been executed yet,” and “He’s still alive” ended with calls for people to keep calling the Department of Justice and leave a message, asking officials to commute Bernard’s death sentence. Read Full Story

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Despite shaky legality, Trump’s Section 230 executive order is still dangerous

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The White House’s plan to loosen social networks’ protections against being sued may be more about intimidation than legislation. When Donald Trump issued his May 28 executive order on “online censorship,” it looked like little more than a temper tantrum. The announcement came down the day after Twitter took the unprecedented step of labeling two presidential tweets with fact check information. Read Full Story

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Hush, Trump. Twitter is going easy on you.

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Twitter has finally used its design to flag Trump’s unfactual hate speech. And contrary to the president’s claims, it’s using a soft touch. For the past four years, Trump has enjoyed free rein on Twitter. Any musing, however racist or threatening , has been treated with diplomatic immunity . Trump has said things on Twitter that would get any normal citizen banned from the service. And yet Twitter let Trump go . . . until this week. Read Full Story

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Twitter and Jack Dorsey face mounting backlash for Trump’s tweets about Joe Scarborough

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Twitter users urged Jack Dorsey to do something about Trump implying without evidence that Joe Scarborough was involved in the death of a onetime intern. Twitter users are calling out CEO Jack Dorsey after the company refused to take down tweets by President Trump, who insinuated without evidence that MSNBC host Joe Scarborough was somehow involved in a 2001 death. Read Full Story

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