To remake the world, give girls all the (power) tools

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In her new book, “Girls Garage,” Emily Pilloton wants to teach girls the skills to get them to enter construction, engineering, and architecture, and change the point of view in those fields. When I used a miter saw for the first time, its 12-inch blade spinning at 3,000 rpm to cut through lumber like butter, I felt like a superhero. With a firm grip and focused eye, the machine screamed, the sawdust flew, and what was once one wooden board became two. It was as if the might of the saw itself had osmosed into my hands, arms, and heart. Read Full Story

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How your business can help fight coronavirus: One brand’s pivot to making masks

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The brand collaborated with a doctor to create a fabric mask with an insert for a HEPA filter. Ellen Bennett felt like she was flailing last week. The owner of Hedley & Bennett worried about how quickly the coronavirus was spreading and was concerned about how she was going to keep paying her 30 employees if the economy shut down. Then, on Friday, she saw that designer Christian Siriano had started making masks to tackle the shortage of medical supplies. “It was like someone flung a brick at my head,” Bennett says. “I’ve always been a wake-up-and-fight kind of a girl. And I thought, ‘This is fucking game time.'” Read Full Story

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Hear the new experience designed to bring people who are blind into the excitement of a tennis match

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Tennis is just a starting point. This technology could soon allow visually impaired people around the world to better experience the joy of live sports. The highs and lows of this year’s Australian Open have been delighting fans around the world, especially during global lockdowns. But not everyone is able to enjoy the thrill of live sports in the same way. For the tennis fans among the 600,000 blind and visually impaired people in Australia—and millions more around the world— experiencing sports broadcasts can be underwhelming. Kala Petronijevic, a young girl who has low vision, says her dad has to commentate every move to her. Maurice Gleeson, a blind tennis fan and the CEO of Blind Sports and Recreation Victoria, says: “Tennis, sadly, hasn’t been anywhere near as accessible as I would like.” Read Full Story

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How filmmaker Matthew Cherry’s ‘Hair Love’ changed the conversation around natural hairstyles

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His Oscar-winning animated short, which showcases a girl’s relationship with her curls and her father, will soon be an animated series. Former NFL player Matthew Cherry had been working in Hollywood for nearly a decade as a writer and editor when he was inspired, by viral videos of dads doing their children’s hair, to make a short film about a girl’s relationship with both her curls and her father. As a child, he rarely saw people who looked like him in the cartoons he watched. Even today, he says, “seeing Black fathers being affectionate toward their kids is an anomaly.” The result is Hair Love , a seven-­minute-long film that won 2020’s Oscar for best animated short. After launching a Kickstarter campaign with an initial goal of $75,000, he raised nearly four times that, allowing him to finance a Hair Love children’s book, which became a best seller. The release …

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Burnout put me in the hospital. This is what I learned about healthy work-life balance

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A neurolinguistics coach recalls when a doctor told her that she was so stressed for so long that she had to either change her lifestyle or have surgery to staple her organs to keep them in place. In my corporate job, I was turning up and smiling at parties, but inside I was burning out and only just treading water. It all felt like too much. I was too far past my boundaries and saw my only choice as quitting. I barely spoke about my situation except to laugh off how awful it was. Read Full Story

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Why Apple is giving to the Malala Fund as part of its climate program

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“When we educate girls, and when we empower them and give them the quality education that they need, it actually helps us to tackle climate change.” The climate emergency doesn’t affect everyone equally: After a climate-linked catastrophe like a hurricane, young girls in developing countries often have to drop out of school to help their families financially, or because their school has been directly destroyed. The irony is that educating girls—which results in a long list of positive outcomes, such as more access to family planning, more productive farms, lower incidents of disease— is a particularly effective, though often overlooked, way of fighting climate change Read Full Story

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