This pandemic isn’t the first time women have left the workforce in droves

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As long as women have been working outside the home, they’ve held a precarious place in the labor force. Over the last year, countless headlines have framed the economic fallout from the pandemic as the first female recession. While overall job losses between men and women now seem relatively comparable , the pandemic has uniquely affected many working women, and especially working mothers. Read Full Story

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The imbalance of labor at home is destroying the American economy

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Women have always done more than their fair share of work at home, and the pandemic has made the problem even worse. Here’s how we can start to fix it before it’s too late. The balance of unpaid work at home for heterosexual women has never been good. Back in 1965 when time-use surveys first started recording the hours dedicated to childcare and housework, they noted that American women were doing almost all of the unpaid work in the home. Read Full Story

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Even women in the C-suite are burning out during the pandemic

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In a survey by Chief, a private club for women executives, 70% of women reported taking on more professional responsibilities since the pandemic started. The lagging economic recovery from the pandemic was laid bare in yet another jobs report last week, as hiring rates continue to fall and temporary unemployment becomes permanent for many Americans. One major story of the pandemic-induced recession has been the damage done to working women, hundreds of thousands of whom were forced to drop out of the workforce or have lost their jobs. And a new survey by Chief, a private club for high-powered women, indicates that women in the executive ranks aren’t exempt from the pandemic’s effects. Read Full Story

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Flexible work programs can help retain working women if designed thoughtfully

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Creating more opportunities for remote and highly flexible work is essential—but companies must avoid common pitfalls. We are facing a gender equality crisis. The numbers have made for a steady string of headlines recently: We hit a 33-year low in women’s labor participation in January, and nearly 3 million women have dropped out of the workforce compared to a year ago. Since February 2020, women have lost a net of 5.4 million jobs , accounting for 55% of net job loss in the U.S. during this crisis, despite making up slightly less than half of the workforce. On a net basis, all 140,000 jobs lost in December 2020 in the U.S. belonged to women, and 2.2 million women have left the workforce entirely. Especially impacted are women of color, who comprise a large portion of the workforce in industries that have been hardest hit by the pandemic , including hospitality, …

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This is how we fix the gender pay gap

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The pandemic has erased 25 years of progress toward gender equity. But there are tangible solutions companies can take to end unequal pay. Women have been getting paid less than men for as long as women have been doing paid work at all. And the fight for equal pay has been going on for just as long . So why does the pay gap persist? Read Full Story

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Women are laboring 71 hours a week during the pandemic, and employers are not offering flexibility

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Most employers have not adjusted. Only half of people working from home say that their employers are allowing more flexibility. Did you know that this article was written while serving kids breakfast and providing 50 pieces of packing tape and “ask to enter” signage for a blanket fort? Welcome to pandemic working. A new survey by LeanIn.org and SurveyMonkey shows that women are doing gargantuan amounts of home labor during the pandemic—and suffering health consequences. Read Full Story

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These are the best cities for women working in tech

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SmartAsset reveals which cities have the most opportunities and the least pay gap. Thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, last year took its toll on many industries, but tech hasn’t suffered like others. In fact, the sector continues to grow and add jobs nationwide. At the same time, it’s still a tough sector for women who want to break in, rise through the ranks, and get paid the same as their male counterparts. Read Full Story

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