This new device captures CO2 from trucks as they drive

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Remora installs a container on semis that lets them collect, store, and then monetize their emissions. It’s turning out to be difficult to electrify semi trucks that regularly travel thousands of miles carrying freight. Manufacturers such as Volvo and Peterbilt have begun to produce electric models—and Tesla’s twice-delayed semi may come out later this year—but it isn’t yet clear how quickly they’ll be adopted. In the meantime, in the U.S. alone, there are around 2 million such trucks on the road. A Detroit-based startup called Remora designed a different solution for them: a device that can capture carbon emissions directly from each tailpipe. Read Full Story

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These new fragrances will be made from carbon captured from the atmosphere

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Beauty giant Coty is using a new source to make the ethanol in its perfumes: carbon emissions. Soon you may be able spritz yourself with a perfume made with alcohol that started out as pollution. Beginning next fall, the ethanol used in some fragrances made by beauty company Coty, which produces the fragrance lines for luxury brands like Dolce & Gabbana, Gucci, and Calvin Klein, will be made from recycled carbon emissions. Read Full Story

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This Al Gore-supported project uses AI to track the world’s emissions in near real-time

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“We intend to trace all significant manmade greenhouse gas emissions and assign responsibility for them.” As the world tries to figure out how to flatten the climate curve—cutting global emissions in half by the end of the decade, and reaching net-zero emissions by the middle of the century—one challenge is how to track current emissions from every power plant, farm, and other source on the planet. A new project called the Climate TRACE Coalition plans to use satellite imagery and AI to track those emissions in near real-time, even if they’re not being reported by the source. Read Full Story

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New York City is testing electric garbage trucks

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Trash pickup could get a lot quieter (and cleaner). A new garbage truck making the rounds on Brooklyn streets might look similar to the thousands of other garbage trucks in New York City. But it’s nearly silent, and there isn’t a tailpipe belching diesel emissions. Huge letters on the side of the truck spell out the difference: “Fully Electric.” Read Full Story

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This Amazon-backed startup makes net-zero fuel for planes, ships, and trucks

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Infinium uses captured CO2 to create synthetic gas to power engines. Amazon says it wants to hit the goal of net-zero carbon emissions by 2040 . Reaching that goal will require emissions cuts across the company’s operations, but one of the biggest challenges will be long-distance transportation—it’s possible to switch to electric delivery vans now for short trips, but cargo ships and large jets can’t yet feasibly run on electricity. Read Full Story

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Emissions dropped during COVID-19. Here’s what cities can do to keep them from rising

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It’s time to double down on electric vehicles. COVID-19 upended our daily lives and shifted our relationship to transportation, although we don’t yet know how trends that started during the pandemic will play out. Will people forsake public transit for cars? Will street closures continue, creating more permanent space for walking, biking, and outdoor restaurants? Will work-from-home continue to be the norm, cutting down on commuting hours—and emissions—in the process? Read Full Story

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This ‘climate-friendly’ snack brand wants to change how we eat

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Made from regeneratively grown wheat and sunflower oil, these crackers have negative emissions. The packaging for a new snack brand called Moonshot doesn’t emphasize the fact that it’s organic. Instead, in large type on the front of the box, it says it’s “climate-friendly.” The ingredients are grown regeneratively, using techniques that can capture and store more carbon in the soil. The shipping is carbon neutral. Any emissions from the product that can’t be reduced have been offset. Read Full Story

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Shining a light on companies that have achieved carbon-neutrality

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The nonprofit Climate Neutral is one of our World Changing Ideas honorees for 2020. A new label will soon start appearing on products you see in stores: “Climate Neutral Certified.” Climate Neutral, a nonprofit launched in 2019, helps brands measure their carbon footprints, offset them by investing in vetted pollution-capturing projects, and make long-term plans to reduce emissions. Once a company goes through the process, it can print the label on its packaging—a symbol the nonprofit hopes will become as ubiquitous as the USDA organic label. Because calculating a corporate carbon footprint can be a pricey, complex process for brands, Climate Neutral also created a new digital tool to make it simpler. “We wanted to democratize the process of carbon counting and demystify it,” says CEO Austin Whitman. “For many companies, just starting to understand where their carbon emissions come from is a huge step forward.” The group recruited more …

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How many carbon emissions has your travel generated? This app calculates it from your inbox

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Every plane trip and Uber ride is in your email. Aerial collects it all and tells you how many trees to protect. Almost a third of greenhouse gas emissions are caused by transportation , which is travel is the focus of a new app that allows users to find out how much carbon their plane, train, and ride-hail trips have emitted into the atmosphere—and to rectify those emissions somewhat by balancing them with actions that help the environment. Read Full Story

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How FedEx plans to become carbon neutral by 2040

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The shipping giant plans to fully electrify its delivery trucks. The planes are a harder problem. If you get a FedEx delivery in some Californian cities later this year, it might show up in a new electric delivery vehicle—and come down the sidewalk in a new electric pallet that helps couriers carry heavier loads. The company will be receiving 500 of the vehicles, from GM’s BrightDrop, as one part of a larger push to make all pickup and delivery vehicles zero emissions. By 2040, FedEx says it plans to become carbon neutral. Read Full Story

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