This map shows what’s slowing down the vaccine rollout where you live

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A variety of factors—from poor healthcare systems to low internet access to vaccine hesitancy—will keep people from getting the vaccine. This map shows where those issues will need to be addressed to end the pandemic. More than two months after the first COVID-19 vaccine was approved in the U.S. and healthcare workers began getting shots, only around 14% of the population has gotten at least one dose. At the current rate of around 1.5 million jabs per day, it will take until next February for 90% of Americans to be vaccinated. Read Full Story

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Moderna chief medical officer: Vaccinated adults could still infect the unvaccinated with COVID-19

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The vaccines ‘do not show that they prevent you from potentially carrying this virus . . . and infecting others.’ We’ve gotten three incredibly good pieces of news in as many weeks when it comes to the COVID-19 pandemic. Each of the last three weeks saw the announcement that another SARS-CoV-2 vaccine has shown promising results and is waiting on regulatory approval so distribution can begin. For some, like front-line healthcare workers, the vaccine could be delivered as early as December. But for most, it’ll be late spring to summer before the mass rollout of vaccinations begins. Yet even then, things may not “get back to normal” as quickly as we’re all hoping it would once a vaccine became available. Read Full Story

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This new Google mapping tool shows cities where they need to plant more trees

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Trees improve urban life, but they’re not equitably distributed. As cities try to fix this, they now can quickly get a sense of what neighborhoods and streets need them most. A new map of Los Angeles highlights one form of inequality: which of the city’s streets and homes get the benefit of shade from the the city’s 10-million-plus trees. The city is the first to pilot a new tool from Google, called Tree Canopy Lab , that was used to create the map. Read Full Story

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COVID-19 vaccine distribution: 5 maps that show how we can get them to everyone

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Distribution of the COVID-19 vaccines will create unprecedented logistical challenges for state and local governments. The ultra-rapid development of multiple COVID-19 vaccines over the last few months has been nothing short of amazing, but these life-saving, economy-rescuing, normal-world-restoring treatments won’t mean a whole lot unless we can actually get them to people. Distribution will have to happen on an unprecedented scale, which presents unprecedented logistical challenges for state and local governments. Read Full Story

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9 maps that show which areas could be more vulnerable to the COVID-19 pandemic

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A collection of interactive maps shows areas with high concentrations of seniors, density, and the uninsured. We’ve known from the beginning that the coronavirus pandemic won’t affect all American populations evenly. If you’re older, uninsured, or otherwise lack access to healthcare, you could be especially more vulnerable to COVID-19, and new data shows that the majority of ICU admissions and deaths in the United States have been occurring in people over 65. Read Full Story

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This map shows where low-income Americans are losing jobs

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The industries taking the most damage from the shutdown are the ones that employ the most low-income workers. This map shows where aid should go. Over the past four weeks, a staggering 22 million Americans filed for unemployment. By one estimate, more than 14 million of those workers had low-income jobs—and as they’re less likely to have emergency savings, they’re in the most precarious position now. A new project from the nonprofit Urban Institute maps out where job losses may be highest across the country. Read Full Story

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This interactive map shows the key places that must be protected to curb climate change

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See where the land is that hasn’t yet been touched by humankind. The world’s population has tripled since 1950, and the number of megacities has grown from one—New York City—to more than 30, from Mexico City to Shenzhen to Hyderabad. But roughly half of the land on the planet is still in a natural or semi-natural state. A new map shows exactly where that land is, and why it’s critical to protect. Read Full Story

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