This is how leaders can end economic inequities, for good

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Today’s leaders can turn to these changes to fight bias and level the playing field. In response to widespread civil unrest from the death of George Floyd, businesses and citizens have made much-needed calls for the reform of police practice, as well as for changes to our justice system. But these alterations are only two of many steps we need to take to alleviate the economic and social inequities that pervade our nation and lie at the heart of systemic racism. Read Full Story

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These two factors help build racial justice and belonging in the workplace

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A leader of Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging at LinkedIn says, “Change doesn’t happen in moments of strength, it happens in moments of vulnerability, and businesses can and must play a leading role in addressing racial equity and driving meaningful progress.” The unconscionable fatal attacks on Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Rayshard Brooks, and George Floyd coupled with the COVID-19 pandemic have illuminated the long-standing racial divide in the U.S. and continued inequalities across healthcare and economic opportunity in this country. Through impassioned protest, we’ve seen the world viscerally respond to centuries of systemic oppression and racism. We’re now at a unique juncture in history to reflect, unlearn, and educate ourselves on the structures of racial oppression and evaluate how to pursue a more equitable future for all. Read Full Story

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The pitchforks are coming if we don’t reform capitalism, says Davos founder

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Klaus Schwab, founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum, says that if you don’t want a revolution, it’s time to use the government to more strongly regulate businesses, address climate change, and fix income inequality. We need a fundamental change to capitalism post COVID-19—one that takes into account social, natural, and human capital, rather than just financial gain—or else economic inequalities will worsen, environmental degradation will continue, and change will come anyway through violent force. That may sound like a radical position, but now it’s coming from the mouth of Klaus Schwab, founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum. Read Full Story

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COVID-19 lockdowns have led to a 17% drop in daily CO2 emissions

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The recovery can try to make structural changes to preserve these gains without economic devastation—or we can just go back to normal. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced countries around the world into lockdowns, and such halts have led to a 17% drop in daily global CO2 emissions—or 17 million tonnes of carbon dioxide each day—during the peak of coronavirus confinement measures in early April. But without structural changes in our economic, transportation, and energy systems, researchers warn that the lower emissions are unlikely to last. Read Full Story

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Why organizations might want to design and train less-than-perfect AI

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Companies “need to change the way they motivate people in environments where parts of their jobs are done by AI,” argues a Stanford economics professor. These days, artificial intelligence systems make our steering wheels vibrate when we drive unsafely, suggest how to invest our money, and recommend workplace hiring decisions. In these situations, the AI has been intentionally designed to alter our behavior in beneficial ways: We slow the car, take the investment advice, and hire people we might not have otherwise considered. Read Full Story

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How the philanthropy world should use this moment to actually help Black people

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“Increasing diversity can be understood as getting more Black people in the room, where they can bear witness. Transformational change is only created by getting the woefully underrepresented a seat at the table, where they can make decisions.” There’s much conversation happening at the moment—across industries and throughout sectors of society—about how to dismantle long-standing systems of inequality in America. Read Full Story

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4 things you can do right now to make the future of work (and life) more inclusive

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Architect and futurist Oshoke Abalu’s “Superpowers and Symphony” is an invitation to create a new story of human connection and organizational unity that embodies our collective intention for the future of inclusion. Just as our broader society is beginning to awaken to the significant systemic changes needed to advance inclusion and equity, our businesses are also realizing that to contribute to a more equitable paradigm, our existing organizational cultures and systems will require a dramatic recalibration, beginning with our shared vision and perception of inclusion. Read Full Story

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5 predictions for how we’ll get around after COVID-19

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These near-term fixes for our cities and transportation systems will have their origins in what we went through last year. The 20th year of the 3rd millennium was a leap year, which added an extra day to its awfulness. There’s no need to recount that awfulness here. Instead, now that we’ve kicked off the New Year, what are some of the good things that we can look forward to in 2021 that likely would not happen without a 2020 defined by a pandemic and economic calamity? Here are five near-term fixes for our cities and our transportation systems that will have their origins in what we went through last year. Read Full Story

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David Chang and other chefs say now is the time to fix the restaurant industry’s long-standing inequities

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Their “Safe and Just Reopening” plan calls for eliminating the tipped minimum wage, pooling tips, and tax relief for the restaurant business. If restaurants have struggled during the pandemic, restaurant workers are struggling even more, in part because their economic situation was already precarious before the outbreak. The federal subminimum wage for tipped workers is still the same as it was nearly 30 years ago: $2.13 an hour. Now, as many restaurants reopen and workers return, some restaurant owners are arguing that the industry needs to fundamentally change. Read Full Story

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