This company is 3D-printing houses in North America. Next stop? The moon

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Icon’s 3D-printed homes have helped tackle the housing crisis in Central Texas and rural Mexico. The company has even bigger goals for its future. For those of us who still equate the word “printer” with a dusty inkjet contraption used to print your homework, the concept of printing a 4,000-square-foot house may be out of this universe. And soon, it might be: Icon , a maker of 3D-printed houses here on earth, wants to take that groundbreaking construction onto the moon and Mars. Read Full Story

Read Full Article on Fast Company

One day, you might live in a 3D-printed house

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Icon—a winner of Fast Company’s 2020 World Changing Ideas Awards—has built a 3D printer so large it can print the walls of a house in 24 hours. Later this year, in a remote part of Southern Mexico, 50 families will move into the world’s first 3D-printed community . And on the outskirts of Austin, Texas, six people who were formerly homeless will move into small 3D-printed homes this May. The two projects are the first large-scale proof that 3D printing technology could be a viable way to quickly build affordable housing. Read Full Story

More

This village for the homeless just got a new addition: 3D-printed houses

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Icon is printing full houses to give Austin’s homeless a real home to live in. For the last few years, Tim Shea has lived in an RV in a small community outside Austin that was designed for people who were once chronically homeless. In early May, he’ll move from the RV into one of the community’s first 3D-printed homes—a small house with walls made from a concrete-like material that were automatically extruded from a giant, 33-foot-long machine. Read Full Story

More

The race to 3D-print 4 million COVID-19 test swabs a week

{ object.primary_image.title }}

3D printing companies hope to help produce tens of millions of swabs for the American public. It’s a race against time. The country needs tens of millions of nasal swabs if it’s going to test enough people for COVID-19 to safely reopen the economy, but swabs are in short supply. A consortium of academics, medical workers, and manufacturers have joined forces to relieve the bottleneck through 3D printing. Read Full Story

More

These 3D-printable add-ons can make home goods more accessible

{ object.primary_image.title }}

The collaboration between McCann and Ikea enhances home furnishings for the disabled. About 15% of the global population has some form of disability. Eldar Yusupov is a Tel Aviv, Israel–based copywriter with cerebral palsy, and in 2017 he happened to mention to his bosses at McCann that the low height of the office couch made it very difficult for him to get up. He liked the Ikea couch, and if it were just a few inches taller, he told them, he would probably even buy one for his own apartment, where most of the furniture is specifically made for a disabled person—and much of it is expensive and unappealing. That conversation sparked more discussion, and eventually, over the next two years, led to ThisAbles, a collaboration between McCann, Ikea, and Israeli disability rights groups to make the Scandinavian company’s iconic home furnishings—couches, dressers, cabinets, lamps, and even shower curtains—more accessible …

More

3D print your own hands-free door handles

{ object.primary_image.title }}

In order to limit how often people touch surfaces, designers are creating 3D printed add-ons to place around the house. Right now, you’re probably doing everything in your power not to touch shared surfaces. But some, like door handles, are virtually impossible to avoid. Here to make your life easier (and more sanitary) is “ hands-free architecture ,” an open platform for downloading and 3D printing designs that can help protect against COVID-19. Read Full Story

More

This wild-looking house is made out of dirt by a giant 3D printer

{ object.primary_image.title }}

These 645-square-foot domed buildings were printed in Italy over the course of 200 hours. Giant 3D printers for construction can help make housing more affordable—as in a neighborhood in Austin, Texas, where a 33-foot-long machine recently squeezed out the walls of tiny new houses for people who were once chronically homeless . But an Italian architecture firm is experimenting with a way to potentially make the process even less expensive, and better for the climate, by using a cheap and readily available building material: local soil. Read Full Story

More

This 3D-printed nasal swab is a design marvel

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Designed and manufactured by Carbon3D and Resolution Medical, the lattice-tipped swab in a 2020 Innovation by Design award winner. This past spring, as medical facilities faced a shortage of nasopharyngeal swabs for COVID-19 testing, Carbon3D and Resolution Medical designed, manufactured, and launched a new swab featuring a carbon lattice tip. All of this took less than three weeks, thanks to 3D-printing techniques. The company is now producing up to a million swabs a week. Read Full Story

More

Ellen Kullman became CEO during the last recession. Here’s how it’s impacting her leadership now

{ object.primary_image.title }}

DuPont’s first female CEO, who served during the 2008 financial downturn, shares what it takes to stay resilient during unpredictable times. Ellen Kullman, CEO of 3D printing company Carbon, knows her way around a crisis. Kullman spent 27 years at chemical company DuPont, where she started as a marketing manager in 1988. She was named the company’s CEO and chairman in January 2009, just a few months after Lehman Brothers declared bankruptcy. Read Full Story

More

This crazy sculpture is made by an MIT-engineered machine that 3D prints biopolymers to replace plastic

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Aguahoja—a winner of Fast Company’s 2020 World Changing Ideas Awards—rethinks the paradigm of recycling. Recycling plastic hasn’t been successful so far: Of the billions of tons of the material that have been produced since 1950 from fossil fuels, less than 10% has been recycled. A project from MIT called Aguahoja rethinks the paradigm of recycling: By using material 3D-printed from sustainable raw ingredients, it’s designed to degrade back into nature instead of ever going to a recycling center. Read Full Story

More

Subscribe to our newsletter

Join our newsletter and never miss out trending marketing news.

HitcountVariables(pk=18408, ajax_url='/api/hit/ajax/', hits='2')