This DIY mask test kit finds that your neck fleece isn’t really helping

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Scientists developing a tool to help mask manufacturers make sure their cloth masks actually work found some masks work better than others, and one kind works particularly badly. If you buy a cloth mask online—whether from Amazon or Etsy or a large manufacturer such as Adidas—you’ll see a warning reminding you that what you’re buying isn’t medical grade. And while the evidence continues to mount that cloth face masks work, it’s also true that every mask isn’t equally effective, and many companies now making masks are doing it for the first time. In the absence of regulation for cloth masks, as shortages of more proven N95 masks continue, how can consumers or the manufacturers making masks know how much protection they offer? Read Full Story

More

When this mask wears out, you can send it back to be recycled—and compost the filter

{ object.primary_image.title }}

The first mask from Masuku doesn’t need to fit tightly to block particles, so it’s more comfortable to wear. Four years ago, long before the pandemic made masks ubiquitous, a U.K.-based startup called Masuku began developing a better face mask to help filter out pollution in smoggy cities. Masks on the market weren’t necessarily comfortable or breathable; they also weren’t sustainable. Read Full Story

More

These transparent face masks could make our interactions a little less awkward

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Face masks will be here for a while. One company is trying to make them more humane. If you’re looking for a face mask, options abound. But whether it’s leopard print, splashed with your team’s logo, or the standard blue medical variety, all of these opaque masks have one problem in common: they cover half of your facial expressions. They’re challenging for the deaf community , not great for babies’ development , and can be dehumanizing. Read Full Story

More

Harvard professor develops a $50 nasal spray to thwart the spread of COVID-19

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Developed by Harvard professor David Edwards—who previously created inhalable chocolate and cocktails—the spray promises to stop the spread of aerosols by as much as 99%. You should practice social distancing and wear a mask to prevent the spread of COVID-19. But even masks aren’t perfect. A high-end N95 mask can filter an estimated 99.8% of the virus from the air, while many cotton masks filter just 50% or less . Given that researchers now know the virus is airborne , you may wonder: Is there anything else you can do to prevent the spread of COVID-19? Read Full Story

More

These face masks are designed to be washed and reused

{ object.primary_image.title }}

This design prioritizes safety and sustainability. As the coronavirus overwhelms hospitals around the world, medical professionals are suffering from a shortage of the personal protective equipment they need to stay safe. In response, people are trying to develop masks that can be washed and reused in contrast to the common, disposable masks that are now in scarce supply. Read Full Story

More

MIT researchers create a reusable silicone mask to replace the N95

{ object.primary_image.title }}

The mask can be easily cleaned after each use, so it could help solve supply issues. And it’s clear, which could help with communication. As new coronavirus cases spike in the U.S.—Florida alone now has 12 times more cases than the entire country of Australia—healthcare workers still face a shortage of N95 masks. Many hospitals are now reusing the masks, even though they’re intended to be thrown out after a single use. Various solutions for disinfecting masks or increasing the supply are in the works , but a new silicone mask now in development is designed to be used and sterilized repeatedly, and could be as effective as the gold standard of an N95 respirator. Read Full Story

More

The case for wearing see-through face masks

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Babies and young children learn by looking at faces. Transparent masks can ensure they continue developing apace. As daycare centers and pre-kindergartens begin to reopen around the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends masks be worn by teachers, care workers, and children over two years of age. Read Full Story

More

Subscribe to our newsletter

Join our newsletter and never miss out trending marketing news.

HitcountVariables(pk=14680, ajax_url='/api/hit/ajax/', hits='1')