This carbon-negative hand sanitizer is made from captured CO2

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Across the country, many distilleries are switching from making booze to making sanitizer. Air Co.’s carbon-neutral vodka factory is doing the same. When it launched last year, the New York City-based startup Air Co. made the world’s first carbon-negative vodka —using captured CO2 instead of yeast to make alcohol. Now, in response to the coronavirus crisis, it’s using that same captured CO2 to make hand sanitizer instead. Read Full Story

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This ‘climate-friendly’ snack brand wants to change how we eat

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Made from regeneratively grown wheat and sunflower oil, these crackers have negative emissions. The packaging for a new snack brand called Moonshot doesn’t emphasize the fact that it’s organic. Instead, in large type on the front of the box, it says it’s “climate-friendly.” The ingredients are grown regeneratively, using techniques that can capture and store more carbon in the soil. The shipping is carbon neutral. Any emissions from the product that can’t be reduced have been offset. Read Full Story

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Coating seeds in this microfungus superpowers plants’ carbon capture abilities

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Soil Carbon Co. is developing a new approach that allows plants to sequester way more carbon than they do naturally, which could help sink billions of tons of carbon into existing farmland. On farms along the East Coast of Australia, growers are testing a new approach to fighting climate change: planting seeds coated in microbial fungi and bacteria that can help capture CO2 from the air. Read Full Story

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These carbon-negative, ocean-degradable straws and forks are made from greenhouse gases

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Newlight has developed a material—made by microbes—that uses methane to make everything from utensils to purses to glasses. At a new production facility in Huntington Beach, California, a 50-foot-tall stainless steel tank is filled with 15,000 gallons of salt water, and inside microbes are turning methane—a potent greenhouse gas—into a new material that could simultaneously help tackle the challenges of climate change and ocean plastic. If the material is made into a disposable fork and ends up in the ocean, it degrades as easily as cellulose, turning into a food source for microbes. Read Full Story

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This carpet company has always been an unlikely environmental leader. Now it’s going further

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Global carpet tile manufacturer Interface launches a new, fully carbon-negative carpet. When designing an environmentally friendly office space, you may not think about the impact of what’s under your feet. Maybe you’re more concerned about the air-conditioning system or lighting, but the carbon footprint of flooring, with lots of square feet to cover, can add up. In response, Interface is now launching its first carbon-negative carpet tile. Read Full Story

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The newest product made from captured CO2 is explosive

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As private space starts booming, the footprint of the industry could become massive. Making the rocket fuel from CO2 could help. When SpaceX launches its Starship rocket, designed to send crew members to the International Space Station, deliver satellites to space, and travel to Mars as early as 2024, each launch will emit an estimated 715 tons of CO2, roughly as much as 10 cross-country flights on a 747. If spaceflight becomes common—and if the rocket is also used for quick trips in place of jets on Earth—it could become a meaningful source of emissions. But rockets can also use zero net carbon fuel. Read Full Story

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This biotech startup is making palm oil-substitutes and omega-3s from carbon emissions

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Both ingredients are usually produced in ways that are deeply damaging to the planet. Now they can be made while lowering our global footprint. Instead of having more carbon go into the atmosphere, making our planet warmer and speeding up the effects of climate change, you might soon be able to eat those emissions. Biotech company LanzaTech has successfully turned CO2 emissions into lipids and omega-3 fatty acids as part of a pilot program in partnership with India’s Department of Biotechnology and oil and gas company IndianOil. Read Full Story

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How to build a zero-carbon skyscraper

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Wooden skyscrapers help sequester a lot of carbon, but they run into problems when they get too tall. This concept design minimizes the footprint but still gets to 105 stories. A typical skyscraper has a massive carbon footprint, both embedded in the production of materials such as concrete and steel and from the energy used to keep it running. But if this new, conceptual 105-story skyscraper is built, it could operate with essentially no carbon footprint at all. Read Full Story

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A hidden source of emissions while we’ve been stuck inside: your home cooking

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Especially if you have a gas stove, spending more time at home for a year may have been bad for your lungs. When Alex Huffman, an aerosol scientist and associate professor at the University of Denver, recently outfitted his house with CO2 monitors—part of a home experiment to see how well different spaces were ventilated—he found out his home was pretty tightly sealed against the outside air, but carbon dioxide exhaled from his family would build up a bit as they lived their lives. There was a bigger surprise, though: When they cooked, the CO2 levels skyrocketed—not only in the kitchen, but throughout the house. Read Full Story

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Companies that make bold climate pledges keep donating to politicians with dismal environmental records

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Does an aggressive corporate climate policy mean that much if the company doesn’t support those same policies through its political donations? Microsoft has pledged to become carbon negative by 2030 and remove all the carbon emissions it has ever produced as a company by 2050. But the company has given about 14% more in campaign contributions to political candidates who have a record of climate obstruction than to those with climate-friendly policies. Read Full Story

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