The plastic industry is using the coronavirus to fight plastic bag bans

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Bag bans that were supposed to go into effect have been halted in several states as the plastic industry plays up fears of infection from reusable bags (but doesn’t mention anything about infection from plastic ones). As the groundswell against single-use plastic has grown, a recent study about the new coronavirus could lend more ammunition: The virus, SARS-CoV-2, can live on plastic for two to three days , versus 24 hours on cardboard. (Another study that looked at related viruses, SARS and MERS, found that some lived on plastic as long as nine days.) But the plastic industry is also using the coronavirus crisis for the opposite reason, to argue that public health requires us to overturn bans on single-use plastic bags at stores. Read Full Story

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Walmart, Target, and CVS team up to reinvent single-use plastic bags

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First they came for plastic cups. Now they’re coming for plastic bags. In 2018, McDonald’s and Starbucks teamed up to create an eco-friendly alternative to the single-use soft drink cup. Coordinated by the investment firm Closed Loop Partners with support from the design studio Ideo, it was an unprecedented, joint effort between rivals to fix the ecological impact at the core of their business. Several of the resulting winners were piloted in stores earlier this year . Read Full Story

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This simple 3D-printable attachment lets you open doors hands-free

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A quick fix for eliminating one particularly common location for potential viral transmission. Current evidence suggests that the virus that causes COVID-19 can live on surfaces such as stainless steel and plastic for up to three days , meaning it may be possible to infect yourself by touching a contaminated surface like a door handle and then touching your mouths, nose, or eyes. People often have to enter and exit rooms or buildings, and until more accessible, automatic doors are installed, we can’t simply tell everyone to stop touching doorknobs. A simple, quick solution are these 3D-printable add-ons that can be fitted onto doors in hospitals and businesses, allowing people to open doors hands free. They could be an easy way to reduce the chance of cross contamination from coronavirus, and generally keep people’s hands cleaner in the future. Read Full Story

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Thinking a lot about microbes these days? Try this 6-week Instagram science course

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Bacterial health company Seed wants you to take a little time off from reading about one virus, and learn about the world’s tiniest creatures and how important they are. The coronavirus pandemic has made us acutely aware of the invisible world of microbes. SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is an invisible threat; we fear door handles secretly teeming with the pathogen, infected respiratory droplets floating unseen in the air. But microbes have always been all around us, and within us—about 38 trillion of them live in and on each of our bodies. Microbial sciences company Seed wants to help everyone learn more about this invisible world, and how microbes are tied to both our and the planet’s health, with a six-week science course you can take entirely on Instagram. Read Full Story

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Coronavirus symptoms: How long do they take to show up? New research paints a fuller picture

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Individuals infected with COVID-19 could be symptom-free for 5 to 11 days, making it more likely they unknowingly spread the disease. New research published in the Annals of Internal Medicine has cast a clear light on the median incubation period of the COVID-19 coronavirus. The researchers examined news reports about the spread of the virus outside of China as well as interviewed people outside of China who became infected with the disease, and from that extrapolated the time frame the coronavirus is likely to infect someone without a person showing symptoms. Read Full Story

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What The Coronavirus (COVID-19) Means For Marketers

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By now you have heard about the Coronavirus . The sad reality is that it is spreading quickly and will continue to spread for a while. Did you know that we are getting roughly 15,000 new cases a day and it’s growing fast ? No one really knows how many people will be infected (or will pass away sadly), but it has caused the global stock markets to crash, which means as a business (or even a marketer), you will be affected. And because my ad agency works with hundreds of companies in all the major sectors and we have 7 offices around the world, we are already starting to see how it is impacting marketing (I’ll share the data below). So what does this mean for you? Well, before I go into that, let me be clear on what marketers should NOT do. Don’t exploit the situation The first …

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This eco-friendly hand sanitizer kills germs and is plastic-free

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By Humankind’s multitasking hand sanitizer kills viruses, moisturizes your skin, and keeps single-use plastic out of landfills. Just over a year after it launched on a mission to eliminate excess packaging and single-use plastic from personal care products, by Humankind has made a name for itself with smartly designed items such as an all-natural refillable deodorant stick, a well-reviewed bar shampoo and conditioner, and just-add-water mouthwash tablets . Read Full Story

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Lego is replacing its clear plastic bags with recyclable paper

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The company wants its packaging to be sustainable by 2025, so the crinkly bags have got to go. If you buy a Lego set today, the toy bricks come packed in tiny numbered plastic bags. Every year, the toy manufacturer uses hundreds of millions of those bags. But the company is starting to phase out single-use plastic, with the goal of making its packaging sustainable by 2025—and those bags are a big part of it. Next year, it will begin rolling out an alternative, with bricks packed in Forest Stewardship Council-certified paper instead. Read Full Story

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This is the safest indoor space to prevent the spread of COVID-19, according to a mechanical engineer

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Let the outdoors in! The vast majority of SARS-CoV-2 transmission occurs indoors , most of it from the inhalation of airborne particles that contain the coronavirus. The best way to prevent the virus from spreading in a home or business would be to simply keep infected people away. But this is hard to do when an estimated 40% of cases are asymptomatic and asymptomatic people can still spread the coronavirus to others . Read Full Story

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This reusable ‘Origami Bottle’ folds to fit in your pocket

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Foldable, reusable packaging could accelerate the switch away from single-use plastics. If you push down on certain points on the new reusable water bottle called the Origami Bottle , the container collapses, folding up so it can easily fit in your bag or even squeeze inside your pocket. The design makes use of a unique geometrical structure that’s sturdy when unfolded—and holds 25 ounces of water—but quickly transforms when empty, with the aim of helping reusable packaging compete with single-use plastic. Read Full Story

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