The EU is launching the world’s greenest coronavirus recovery plan

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The proposal would invest 750 billion euros in energy-efficient renovations, clean transportation, and renewable energy. While the Trump administration tries to help struggling oil companies and continues to roll back environmental policies , the European Union is planning a green recovery, with a new proposal to pour hundreds of billions of euros into new renewable energy, clean transportation, building renovation, and other programs designed to help Europe shrink its carbon footprint. Read Full Story

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Could renewable energy be the secret to Europe’s economic recovery post-COVID-19 ?

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Bulgaria, Czechia, Poland, and Romania are among the European Union’s most coal-intensive economies. A new report shows how investing in clean energy in these countries could drive Europe’s green recovery. As European countries such as Belgium and Sweden shutter coal power plants and invest in renewable energy sources, Eastern Europe has clung to coal—in part because the switch to renewables has been an expensive investment. But with wind and solar getting cheaper , and with a need for robust economic recovery plans in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new report shows how four Eastern European countries could affordably invest in clean energy, and with that investment, help bring about a green recovery for all of Europe. Read Full Story

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BP wants to become the world’s largest renewables producer (but still pump a lot of oil)

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Its fossil fuel production will shrink by at least 1 million barrels of oil a day compared to what it produced in 2019 as it expands its clean energy portfolio. But the company will still be a major contributor to climate change. One of the largest oil companies in the world is now making a major shift to renewable electricity. By 2030, BP plans to spend $5 billion a year on low-carbon energy, becoming one of the largest producers of renewables in the world. The company announced a new strategy today that it says “will reshape its business as it pivots from being an international oil company focused on producing resources to an integrated energy company.” Read Full Story

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Amazon will invest $2 billion in climate tech

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Its new fund, called the Climate Pledge Fund, will invest in companies working on transportation and logistics, energy generation and storage, the circular economy, and agriculture. Nine months after Amazon announced that it planned to become carbon neutral by 2040 , the company is now launching a $2 billion internal venture capital fund to invest in technology to help it reach that goal. Read Full Story

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This sustainable neighborhood of the future is designed to manage both climate change and pandemics

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A proposal for a new city in China is designed to be as green as possible—and also make it easy to isolate in the case of another outbreak. Eighty miles southwest of Beijing, the Chinese government is planning a new five-million person city as a model of sustainability—powered by clean energy, featuring huge green spaces, and unsullied by many cars. A new design shows what neighborhoods in the city, called Xiong’an New Area, might look like. Read Full Story

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The U.S. can get to 90% clean electricity in just 15 years

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And by 2045, the electric grid could be entirely renewable. Until recently, climate experts projected that it wouldn’t be possible to decarbonize the electric grid until 2050—and that moving to fully renewable energy could raise the price of electricity for consumers. But the cost of wind, solar, and battery storage has fallen so quickly that in just 15 years, the U.S. could feasibly run on 90% clean electricity, with no increase in electric bills. And adding new renewable infrastructure could create more than half a million new jobs each year. By 2045, the entire electric grid could run on renewables. Read Full Story

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Biden-Sanders task force proposals could actually move the needle on climate action

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The Biden-Sanders task force recently released its policy recommendations for Joe Biden. Its ambitious climate goals would get the U.S. to 100% clean energy sooner than Biden’s current plan, and create hundreds of thousands of good paying, possibly union jobs. Under a Biden administration, the U.S. may set out to reach 100% clean energy by 2035, and net-zero carbon emissions in new buildings by 2030. Read Full Story

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Your company can now offer clean energy as a work-from-home perk

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Arcadia, which lets you buy clean energy regardless of where you live, is now working with companies to offset their workers new, higher home energy footprints. Remote work can provide plenty of advantages —flexibility for families, no commute, increased productivity—but it also comes with some downsides, like higher home energy use and no more free coffee or other office perks. Now, businesses can offer clean energy as a work-from-home benefit, and even subsidize those higher monthly bills, through a new program from renewable energy platform Arcadia. Read Full Story

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Heathrow’s planned new runway just got canceled—thanks to the Paris Agreement

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For the first time ever, the Paris climate agreement has formed the basis of a major court ruling. The project to expand London’s Heathrow airport was first proposed in 2009, and it has had a turbulent journey since. It was initially backed by a Labour government, canceled a year later, revived, then backed by a Conservative government in 2018. Proponents have touted the plan as a source of extra jobs, additional air routes, and fewer delays. The U.K. Department of Transport has estimated an economic benefit of £61 billion, or $79 billion, over the next 60 years. Read Full Story

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The enormous COVID-19 recovery plans show there’s money to solve climate change

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We’re spending 15% of global GDP on one crisis. What would happen if we treated the climate crisis the same way? The amount of funding that governments are throwing at the economic recovery from COVID-19—more than $12 trillion announced so far, or 15% of the global GDP—is unprecedented. How much of that would it take to put the global energy system on track to meet the goals of the Paris climate agreement? With only a fraction of the pandemic recovery money, we could fund the transition to clean energy. Read Full Story

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