The enormous COVID-19 recovery plans show there’s money to solve climate change

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We’re spending 15% of global GDP on one crisis. What would happen if we treated the climate crisis the same way? The amount of funding that governments are throwing at the economic recovery from COVID-19—more than $12 trillion announced so far, or 15% of the global GDP—is unprecedented. How much of that would it take to put the global energy system on track to meet the goals of the Paris climate agreement? With only a fraction of the pandemic recovery money, we could fund the transition to clean energy. Read Full Story

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How COVID relief funds could boost a green recovery

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It would cost around $1.4 trillion per year over the next five years in clean-energy investment to meet the goals of the Paris climate agreement. That money could fuel a global economic recovery at the same time. As of late summer, governments around the world had pledged $12.2 trillion of relief in response to the coronavirus pandemic. That’s around 15% of global gross domestic product , three times larger than government spending put forward during and after the 2008-2009 global financial crisis and enough for every adult in the world to receive a $2,000 check. Read Full Story

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These are the top 10 insights from climate science in 2020

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Here’s what we learned in the last year about how we can steer our way out of the climate crisis. Each year we learn more about climate change: what to expect, what we need to do to avoid the worst effects, how our planet will change, and how those changes will affect our own lives. But it can be hard to know how all the new information should inform your understanding of the issue. To help, 57 top researchers from 21 different countries have distilled the current understanding of climate news into a list of the 10 most important climate insights from 2020, ranging from news about new risks like larger emissions from our thawing permafrost to crucial steps we need to take, like setting aside COVID-19 recovery investments for climate goals. Read Full Story

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We’re at a climate turning point. COVID-19 recovery plans could tip the scales

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What sort of future do we want? The pandemic recovery plans lawmakers are creating now will decide. It’s 2030. You live in a 15-minute city and bike to work on a network of bike paths; most of the vehicles that are still on the road, from delivery trucks to school buses, are electric, running on wind and solar power from a revamped power grid. Formerly redlined neighborhoods have been planted with trees, equipped with electric carsharing, and covered in solar panels. When you want to take a quick trip to another city, you ride on an electric high-speed train. Read Full Story

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How COVID-19 has dramatically changed business at Volvo, and what they’re doing about it

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30-second summary: ClickZ hosted a webinar, The Impact of COVID-19 on the Automotive Industry & Marketing with Trevor Hettesheimer, Manager, KPI’s, Analytics, Search & Planning at Volvo. There has been a sharp drop in automotive sales compared to the 2020 forecast in January, which predicted 16.8 million in total sales and 13.4 million in retail sales. As a result of nationwide shutdowns combined with an oil price war, automotive industry sales were down 41% in March 2020 compared with the previous year. To help mitigate the impact on its business, Volvo took inventory of their U.S. dealerships and assessed who could remain open for sales and service. They then assessed what dealers could do business online and brainstormed ways they could safely deliver cars or allow consumers in lockdown to have their cars serviced. Hettesheimer noted that the most significant drop in sales would likely be April at 60-80% below …

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Shifting to plant-based plastic is a start—but it can’t be the only solution to plastic waste

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It would take a major reshaping of global agriculture to generate enough material to replace petroleum-based plastic with plant-based ones. Circularity has to be the end goal. To solve our climate crisis, there’s no doubt that we need to change the way we create—and dispose—of everyday things. Nonrenewable fossil fuels are used to make a nearly endless list of items, from plastic forks to styrofoam packaging to synthetic fabrics to steel and concrete. Not only do these products require limited resources and significant amounts of energy to produce, they can be nearly impossible to get rid of. Our recycling system is inadequate, these materials take thousands of years to break down, and so our planet continues to fill up with trash . Read Full Story

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Wake up call for content marketers, COVID-19 is still here

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30-second summary: 94%of content marketers think they succeeded in adopting their content marketing strategy to the COVID-19 pandemic Only 25% think that the COVID-19 outbreak had a major impact on their marketing strategy. A Minor 15% of feel the pandemic will have a major long-term impact on their organization’s overall marketing success. Global content marketing is projected to decline 1.9% in 2020. Overall, marketing professionals tend to be overconfident and downplay the impact of this global crisis. Self-deception is defined by Wikipedia as “a process of denying or rationalizing away the relevance, significance, or importance of opposing evidence and logical argument. Self-deception involves convincing oneself of a truth (or lack of truth) so that one does not reveal any self-knowledge of the deception.” Savvy B2B marketers often have the reputation of being able to praise the products and services they are pushing regardless of their real value. But these days …

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Building Back Greener: How COVID-19 recovery could shape a brighter climate future

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As the world imagines emerging from the pandemic, can we create a different world instead of simply going back to old normal? We are in the crosshairs of multiple crises: the COVID-19 pandemic, the economic downturn, clear signs of climate catastrophe in the wildfires in the American West, and a record-breaking hurricane season. It can feel impossible to think past these moments, in which the pandemic seems never-ending and yet the time left to stave off irreversible climate change is running out. Read Full Story

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5 lessons from COVID-19 that will help us build a sustainable future

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As one global crisis begins to end, we still face another: What can we learn from our response to the pandemic to improve the fight against climate change? COVID-19 has forced us to change our ingrained behavior, for the well-being of ourselves and the wider community. But where the pandemic has affected immediate action to deal with clear and present danger, climate change has not. Despite having long predated COVID-19, and triggered more than 100 world disasters since the beginning of the pandemic alone, the climate crisis still receives inadequate action. Read Full Story

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COVID-19 lockdowns have led to a 17% drop in daily CO2 emissions

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The recovery can try to make structural changes to preserve these gains without economic devastation—or we can just go back to normal. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced countries around the world into lockdowns, and such halts have led to a 17% drop in daily global CO2 emissions—or 17 million tonnes of carbon dioxide each day—during the peak of coronavirus confinement measures in early April. But without structural changes in our economic, transportation, and energy systems, researchers warn that the lower emissions are unlikely to last. Read Full Story

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Could civilian national service speed up our COVID recovery?

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Serve America Together wants to get 250,000 young Americans involved in national service as an all-hands-on-deck approach to pandemic recovery. Far down in the text of the American Rescue Plan—the long-awaited economic stimulus package that has now passed in the House, bringing direct payments, unemployment benefits, and child tax credits to many Americans—is $1 billion of additional funds for national service programs like AmeriCorps as a way to help communities recover from COVID-19. But proponents of those programs are asking for even more money to speed up our pandemic recovery, and so young people, many of whom are financially constrained, have the chance to join those efforts. Read Full Story

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