The controversial ‘On the Record’ documentary deftly tackles the complexities of #MeToo and intersectionality

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The doc that shook up Sundance is finally here—and it’s easily one of the most nuanced portraits of how race and privilege play into the #MeToo movement. Since the #MeToo movement blew the lid off of systemic sexual assault and harassment across the entertainment industry, women of color have had to speak up a little louder for their stories to be heard. Read Full Story

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Exclusive: Time’s Up releases guide to prioritizing diversity during COVID-19

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With this practical guide, Time’s Up wants to help business leaders double down on their commitments to equity and inclusion—even during a pandemic. Since March, there have been endless predictions from futurists and Twitter pundits alike on how the coronavirus could shape the future of work , reconfiguring everything from office layouts to daily commutes . But leaders at Time’s Up—the initiative borne out of the #MeToo movement to combat workplace sexual harassment and assault—felt like something was noticeably absent from most of those projections. Read Full Story

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This is how women of color can navigate relationships with white ‘allies’

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“I have a responsibility as a leader to do my due diligence when an ‘ally’ offers support,” says the cofounder and CEO of Future For Us. As such, she explains how to vet allyship support to determine if it’s predatory, performative, or authentic. White feminism as we know it is burning up in flames. The #BlackLivesMatter movement is calling for accountability on leaders across government sectors, large corporations, and local communities that have been benefiting and profiting off of the Black community for centuries. Shamefully, white female-led companies are some of the biggest offenders of marginalization. Read Full Story

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When it comes to diversity in tech, history doesn’t have to repeat itself

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The #MeToo movement barely moved the needle for women in tech. Here’s what executives should be thinking about if they truly want to respond to Black Lives Matter. We’re witnessing history as the Black Lives Matter movement is sweeping through the U.S. and around the world and people rise to fight racism. This also means that there’s now not a single day that passes without some tech company CEO or VC embracing the Black Lives Matter movement publicly. They go on TV to talk about the need for more diversity on boards and leadership teams, announce on Twitter new recruiting practices to increase pipeline diversity, launch investment funds focused exclusively on Black entrepreneurs, and promise on Instagram that they’re going to educate themselves. Read Full Story

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