The ACA may be poised to survive another Supreme Court challenge

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Today, the Supreme Court met to hear arguments in favor of tearing down the Affordable Care Act. Justices seemed inclined to separate out the individual mandate and keep the rest of the law. This morning, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments challenging the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. Five justices signaled that they were not inclined to strike down the full law based on issues with a single provision. If the law were killed, it would cause 20 million Americans to lose insurance. Read Full Story

Read Full Article on Fast Company

Planned Parenthood asks companies to pledge to guarantee employee birth control coverage

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Tumblr, Postmates, and more commit to keeping coverage even if the Supreme Court throws out a government mandate to provide it. Currently, under the Affordable Care Act, most employers are mandated to cover their employees’ contraceptives through company health care plans, but a forthcoming Supreme Court decision could upend that obligation. The Supreme Court this term is set to rule on two Trump administration rules that would allow employers and universities to deny health coverage for birth control because of “religious” or “moral” objections. To get ahead of that ruling, Planned Parenthood is asking companies to become a “Business for BC” and pledge that they will guarantee employee birth control coverage, whether or not they are required to do so by law. Read Full Story

More

Packing the Supreme Court, explained

{ object.primary_image.title }}

If Trump replaces Justice Ginsburg this close to the election, Democrats are discussing a bold response: adding justices to the Supreme Court—because nowhere in the Constitution does it say there must be nine. The U.S. Supreme Court hasn’t always had nine justices—it started with six, went briefly down to five, back to six, then seven, then nine, and, during the Civil War, ten. If Trump confirms a replacement for Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Democrats later regain the presidency and Senate, Democrats are threatening to change the number again. Read Full Story

More

Watch the pro-choice rally outside the Supreme Court as it could decide the future of abortion in America

{ object.primary_image.title }}

If SCOTUS upholds a Louisiana law, it could be a sign a more conservative Supreme Court is willing to overturn other abortion laws. Today the Supreme Court is hearing a case about a Louisiana abortion law that could have ramifications across America. As NPR reports , SCOTUS is hearing arguments in a case to decide whether an abortion access law in Louisiana can go forwards. That law mandates that any doctor performing an abortion in the state can only do so if they have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. “Admitting privileges” is when a doctor has an agreement with a hospital to be able to send and treat their patients there. Read Full Story

More

This Turbo Tax-like tool helps Dreamers automate their immigration forms

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Immigrants Like Us is designed to take the complex legal forms required for immigration and make them simple for laypeople to fill out without a lawyer. The Supreme Court is expected to soon decide if the Trump administration acted lawfully when it ended DACA, the program that allows immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as children to legally continue living and working in the country with two-year permits. As some “Dreamers” scramble to renew their status—not knowing what will happen after the court decision—a new tool is designed to help them complete the necessary forms online even if they can’t afford a lawyer. Read Full Story

More

Amy Coney Barrett Senate vote: What to know about the Supreme Court confirmation, swearing-in process

{ object.primary_image.title }}

With Democrats powerless to stop it, Senate Republicans are set to confirm the next Supreme Court justice this afternoon. Senate Republicans are set to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett as the next Supreme Court justice this afternoon—despite universal objections from Democrats, despite a divided public, and despite the fact that those same Republicans pretended to oppose election-year SCOTUS confirmations in 2016. Read Full Story

More

Subscribe to our newsletter

Join our newsletter and never miss out trending marketing news.

HitcountVariables(pk=11222, ajax_url='/api/hit/ajax/', hits='1')