The 2020 presidential election will decide the fate of the climate

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As we approach planetary tipping points, it’s vital to understand the two candidates’ plans—or lack thereof (Trump doesn’t have one)—for combatting climate change. Whether the world succeeds in avoiding the worst impacts of climate change is likely to hinge in part on the results of the upcoming U.S. election. Climate scientist Michael Mann has said that a second Trump term would be “game over” for the climate, making it virtually impossible to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. Biden, by contrast, is proposing the most ambitious climate policy of any major party nominee in U.S. history. Here’s a closer look at the differences. Read Full Story

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What Biden could do on climate—even with a Republican Senate

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The election hasn’t been called, but should Biden win but not control the Senate, he can still put us back in the Paris agreement—and push change via regulations and executive action. On November 4, Trump officially withdrew from the Paris climate agreement . If Biden wins, on his first day in office on January 20, he plans to rejoin it—a first step in setting the U.S. on a path to tackle climate change, which Biden has called the “number one issue facing humanity.” Read Full Story

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On top of everything else, the U.S. withdraws from the Paris climate agreement tomorrow

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What happens next depends on the results of the election. Three years after the Trump administration began the process of withdrawing from the Paris climate agreement—the landmark international deal to limit global warming—the U.S. has now reached the date when it can officially pull out: November 4, the day after the election. But depending on the results, the withdrawal might not last long. Read Full Story

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Latino voters are going to be key in 2020—and they care deeply about the climate

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Compared to other groups, Latino voters are more worried about the crisis, more willing to take action, and more likely to say they will vote for a candidate because of their stance on climate change. President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden are in a dead heat in Texas, a state that has swung Republican in every presidential election since 1976. If Biden pulls off the unthinkable and defeats Trump in Texas, it will be by mobilizing Latino voters. Read Full Story

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How to watch the last presidential debate tonight on CNN, MSNBC, and elsewhere live without cable

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President Trump and former vice president Joe Biden will face off in Nashville for the last debate of the 2020 presidential election. The second and final presidential debate between Donald Trump and Joe Biden will take place tonight at Belmont University in Nashville. Although few voters likely remain undecided this late in the election season—and, in fact, more than 46 million have already cast their ballots —the event will nevertheless offer the candidates one last dialogue (combative as it may be) on a host of high-stakes topics, including the coronavirus pandemic, climate change, racial justice, and national security. Kristen Welker of NBC News will moderate. Read Full Story

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The Netherlands is slashing emissions by as much as 12 megatons this year—because of a lawsuit

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After losing a final appeal on a 2015 lawsuit, the Dutch government is being forced to invest billions to put itself on a path to be carbon neutral by 2050. As the Trump administration continues to roll back climate policy in the U.S., including changes to clean car rules that will allow cars to emit nearly a billion tons more carbon dioxide than they otherwise would have, the Netherlands is moving in the other direction, rolling out a set of new policies that will drastically cut emissions this year and put the country well on the path to its goal of becoming climate neutral by 2050. Read Full Story

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Packing the Supreme Court, explained

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If Trump replaces Justice Ginsburg this close to the election, Democrats are discussing a bold response: adding justices to the Supreme Court—because nowhere in the Constitution does it say there must be nine. The U.S. Supreme Court hasn’t always had nine justices—it started with six, went briefly down to five, back to six, then seven, then nine, and, during the Civil War, ten. If Trump confirms a replacement for Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Democrats later regain the presidency and Senate, Democrats are threatening to change the number again. Read Full Story

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Biden plans to fight climate change in a way no U.S. president has before

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The former governor of Colorado explains how the government can institute a comprehensive and coordinated “all hands on deck” approach to the climate crisis. Joe Biden is preparing to deal with climate change in a way no U.S. president has done before – by mobilizing his entire administration to take on the challenge from every angle in a strategic, integrated way. Read Full Story

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When does the Electoral College vote? Key dates and deadlines to know as final states certify

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President-elect Joe Biden will be sworn in as the next U.S. president in less than eight weeks. Here are a few final election-related dates to watch. With less than eight weeks to go before President-elect Joe Biden is sworn in as the next president of the United States, legal challenges to the election results have clearly not gone well for incumbent President Donald Trump and his team. Read Full Story

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CEOs: If you really believe in stakeholder capitalism, now is your chance to make it real

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The business community has spent the Trump administration talking about creating a more just system for companies, employees, and the world. Now that the White House is listening, will they use their power to make it happen—or was it all talk? Many corporate executives are looking forward to the prospect of divided government in Washington, with President-elect Joe Biden in the White House but Republicans potentially holding onto the Senate, because they hope it will limit the chances of what they see as progressive overreach. But CEOs who have made commitments on issues such as climate change and racial justice should reject the outdated mantra that all regulation is bad for business and use their influence to push for a “stakeholder capitalism agenda,” both with Republicans on Capitol Hill and the Biden administration. Read Full Story

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