Some Big Tech companies may be tapping the brakes on the work-from-home forever trend

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A year into the global pandemic, Amazon and Google are pushing for a return to the office. In March 2020, when the nation began working from home after the coronavirus pandemic breached U.S. shores, the shift was immediate and extreme. Speculators mused that the worldwide experiment in remote business would revolutionize the work economy. And naturally Big Tech, which had already pioneered the digital frontier, seemed poised to lead the charge. Read Full Story

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Microsoft sees impressive growth despite epidemic, but LinkedIn lays off nearly 1,000

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Microsoft is a big company. Some parts got a boost from the pandemic, while other parts suffered from it. Microsoft’s cloud services and gaming businesses may have gotten a boost from the work-from-home revolution brought on by the coronavirus pandemic . Both its Azure cloud business, which serves digital services to phones and homes, and its gaming business saw strong gains in the June-ending quarter. Read Full Story

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Zoom doesn’t really have 300 million users

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Zoom counted users who participated in multiple calls in a single day as separate users, artificially inflating its user base. If there’s a single tech company that has benefitted more than others from the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s Zoom. Before the pandemic, not many people outside the business world had heard of the app, but now it’s become a household name thanks to its usage skyrocketing as millions are forced to work from home during lockdowns. Read Full Story

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Companies are rushing to reopen their offices. Here’s what they’re getting wrong

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Flexible work is here to stay. Where we get our work done is less important than how we get our work done. The coronavirus pandemic forced many of us to work from home, and the big surprise is: Work got done. Employees are still productive. They like the freedom of remote work. Yet some organizations are scrambling to reopen their offices as quickly as possible, and to do so, they are trotting out design solutions that supposedly protect workers, from algorithms for re-densifying offices to clinical “scrub” rooms in reception areas to the sorts of cubicles made infamous by Dilbert and “The Office.” One problem: These strategies are reactionary and irrelevant long-term. To cultivate the office of the future, companies need to acknowledge three truths about the modern workplace that existed even before COVID-19: Read Full Story

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