Shareholders sue Pinterest over pattern of race and gender discrimination

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The suit was filed in California federal court on Monday after allegations from high-profile executives, including Pinterest’s former Chief Operating Officer. Shareholders of Pinterest are suing members of the company’s board of directors and several top executives for allegedly ignoring or deliberately enabling discrimination against women and people of color. Read Full Story

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‘Blatant racism in practice’: For Pinterest whistleblowers, COO’s settlement is a slap in the face

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Critics say Pinterest’s $22.5 million settlement with its former COO highlights the company’s inequitable treatment of the Black women who first alerted the world to Pinterest’s discrimination problems. Earlier this week, Pinterest settled a gender discrimination lawsuit with its former chief operating officer for $22.5 million—one of the largest public individual settlements for gender discrimination in history. The seven-figure award goes to Francoise Brougher, once the number two executive at Pinterest, who says she was fired in retaliation for raising claims of pay disparity, discrimination, and exclusion at the virtual pinboard company. Read Full Story

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Former Pinterest executive: ‘I really hit the glass ceiling very hard’

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At the Fast Company Innovation Festival, Françoise Brougher talked about her experience with gender discrimination—and what companies can do to create a more equitable work culture. In April, Françoise Brougher was fired from her post as the chief operating officer at Pinterest. The news was delivered to her during a 10-minute video call, and, as Brougher later recounted in a Medium post , the only explanation Pinterest offered was that she was not collaborative and lacked “strong cross-functional relationships.” Read Full Story

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As companies try to address racism, a generic response is no longer enough

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Where a simple statement might once have been enough, companies that don’t match actions to words aren’t cutting it anymore for consumers. When JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon took a knee with employees to signal support for the Black Lives Matter movement, the move brought more criticism than praise. Activists and Black business owners were quick to point out the bank’s recent history of lending discrimination and its lack of Black executives. Similarly, companies including Estée Lauder, Pinterest, and Facebook were also blasted for taking strong public stances against racial injustice while failing to address racism within their own organizations or make progress diversifying their workforce and management ranks. Criticism of hollow corporate statements on social media has been so widespread that it even earned its own hashtag: #pulluporshutup. Read Full Story

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Why so many women in tech get told they’re ‘not strategic’

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A female tech executive breaks down what’s really going on when qualified women are hit with this often-bogus claim. When former Pinterest COO Francoise Brougher wrote last month about “rampant discrimination, hostile work environment, and misogyny” at the company she once led, her story cut to the quick for many women in tech. Brougher was fired in April after a successful two-year tenure when, she says, she spoke up about gender discrimination at the male-dominated social media giant. She has since filed suit . Read Full Story

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Exclusive: Ex-Google employee Chelsey Glasson sues over alleged pregnancy discrimination

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The state lawsuit against Google will unfold alongside an ongoing investigation by the EEOC into Glasson’s allegations of discrimination and retaliation. While on maternity leave last summer, Chelsey Glasson made the difficult decision to leave Google. As Glasson exclusively told Fast Company in a detailed first-person account, it was the culmination of a year punctuated by alleged pregnancy discrimination and retaliatory behavior from multiple bosses. In September, Glasson filed a discrimination complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)—usually the first step toward taking legal action—and earlier this year, the agency opened an investigation into her claims. Read Full Story

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This California bill could help more tech whistleblowers speak out

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The Silenced No More Act releases workers who’ve faced any kind of discrimination from their nondisclosure agreements. Tech employees who face discrimination and harassment at work may soon have a much easier path to coming forward and making their stories public. Many of these types of stories never see the light of day because companies often push employees with allegations into non-disclosure agreements, where they agree never to reveal what happened to them—even to family members and friends—under the threat of a lawsuit. Read Full Story

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Discrimination charges at Pinterest reveal a hidden Silicon Valley hiring problem

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Two Black women who worked at Pinterest went public with their stories of pay disparity and discrimination. Their experience illuminates tech’s wider problems with pay “leveling.” In July of 2018, Ifeoma Ozoma started a new job as the public policy and social impact manager at Pinterest. After working on the large public policy teams at Facebook and Google, she was excited to be the second person on Pinterest’s team, where her responsibilities included leading half of the global public policy team’s work. She believed she would be building the team from the ground up, with the head of public policy as her partner. Plus, Pinterest was pre-IPO, meaning that there was a significant financial opportunity to be had once the company went public. Read Full Story

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