What does it take to close a national park? Not a pandemic, it seems

{ object.primary_image.title }}

In response to COVID-19, some national parks have closed preemptively, and some have stayed open. Instead of a national plan, it’s taking the discovery of an infection at each individual park to close them down. The Grand Canyon, the second-most-popular national park in the country, officially closed to the public Wednesday—but only after one of the 2,500 residents of the onsite cluster of small towns called South Rim, tested positive for the coronavirus, and a week after officials of Coconino County, where the park is located, urged the park service to close due to “extreme concern” for the safety of the local community. Read Full Story

More

This tech is bringing water to Navajo Nation by pulling it out of the air

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Zero Mass Water’s Source hydropanels use sunlight to absorb water vapor from the air. In the Navajo Nation, where running water is scarce and COVID-19 is surging, they’re providing a lifeline. In the Navajo Nation, sometimes a single spigot on an empty road is the only water source around for hundreds of residents. Others have to drive from their rural homes into towns miles away to buy all the water they need for cooking, drinking, cleaning, and livestock, because there’s no infrastructure to bring it through pipes. About 40% of households in the Navajo Nation live without running water. But now, at a few houses, panels positioned on the ground pull moisture from the air, connecting to a tap inside the home and providing up to 10 liters of water—or about 20 16-ounce bottles—a day, at no cost to the family. Read Full Story

More

New privacy protections could make some 2020 census data ‘unacceptably wrong’

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Adding randomness to census data is supposed to safeguard your privacy. But geography data expert Nicholas Nagle says this could lead to some data being shockingly inaccurate. Census data can be pretty sensitive—it’s not just how many people live in a neighborhood, a town, a state, or the nation as a whole. Every 10 years, the Census Bureau asks about people’s ages , racial and ethnic backgrounds, personal relationships to others they live with, and more. It’s information many people don’t share with neighbors or co-workers, much less the federal government . Read Full Story

More

Subscribe to our newsletter

Join our newsletter and never miss out trending marketing news.

HitcountVariables(pk=9302, ajax_url='/api/hit/ajax/', hits='3')