This is how the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is different from Pfizer and Moderna’s shots

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It only requires one dose and doesn’t need to be kept as cold. The first two COVID vaccines approved in the U.S. both use first-of-a-kind technology called messenger RNA. Johnson & Johnson’s new vaccine is different, and the technology it uses may have helped give it two advantages: It only requires a single dose, and it can be stored for months in a refrigerator instead of an ultra-cold freezer. Read Full Story

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The U.S. is not vaccinating nearly enough people yet to make an impact on the pandemic

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America is administering vaccines at a rate of one million a week—far too slow to reach herd immunity by summer. Operation Warp Speed is sputtering. Under the Trump administration’s vaccination roll out, the goal was to have 20 million Americans receive their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine by the end of December–a critical step in not only inoculating the most vulnerable, but also eventually achieving herd immunity in the country (it is estimated that between 80-90% of Americans would need to be vaccinated to reach herd immunity). Read Full Story

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This map shows what’s slowing down the vaccine rollout where you live

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A variety of factors—from poor healthcare systems to low internet access to vaccine hesitancy—will keep people from getting the vaccine. This map shows where those issues will need to be addressed to end the pandemic. More than two months after the first COVID-19 vaccine was approved in the U.S. and healthcare workers began getting shots, only around 14% of the population has gotten at least one dose. At the current rate of around 1.5 million jabs per day, it will take until next February for 90% of Americans to be vaccinated. Read Full Story

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Corporate consolidation could spell trouble for COVID-19 vaccine production

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Has a lack of competition created potential bottlenecks in manufacturing everything we need to vaccinate the country? While initial news about Pfizer’s and Moderna’s vaccine developments is promising, we have many steps left to go before those vaccines enter arms. Still ahead are the manufacture and distribution of roughly 650 million doses. Along with that feat of pharmaceutical production, we also need to make millions of ancillary products such as chemical additives, vials, syringes, and rubber stoppers. Do we have the capacity? Read Full Story

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This company is preparing to manufacture 100 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines

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The pharmaceutical company Sanofi is retrofitting current manufacturing facilities so they’ll be able to pump out millions of COVID-19 vaccine doses when it is finally developed. There are 76 vaccine candidates for COVID-19, five of which are in clinical trials. It will take at least 18 months to determine if these vaccines are effective and safe enough to distribute en masse. Then, distributing them to millions of people will require an incredible feat of manufacturing. Read Full Story

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