Malala Yousafzai is surviving the pandemic by starting a book club

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Read “White Teeth” with the Nobel Prize-winning advocate for girl’s education. Growing up in the Swat Valley in Pakistan, Malala Yousafzai was denied an education as Taliban forces invaded and stopped girls from going to school. She became an outspoken activist for girl’s education . In response, she was shot by the Taliban in October 2012, when she was 15. She survived, and went on to develop a global platform—and win the Nobel Peace Prize. This year, she completed her education at Oxford University. Read Full Story

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What the United Nations World Food Program’s Nobel Peace Prize win says about global hunger

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The WFP assists 97 million people in 88 countries, showing the growing problem of global food insecurity. The 2020 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to the United Nations World Food Program for its efforts to combat hunger, foster conditions for peace in conflict-affected areas, and prevent the use of hunger as a weapon of war. This choice starkly underscores growing concern about increasing global food insecurity and the clear connections between hunger and conflict. Read Full Story

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Why Apple is giving to the Malala Fund as part of its climate program

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“When we educate girls, and when we empower them and give them the quality education that they need, it actually helps us to tackle climate change.” The climate emergency doesn’t affect everyone equally: After a climate-linked catastrophe like a hurricane, young girls in developing countries often have to drop out of school to help their families financially, or because their school has been directly destroyed. The irony is that educating girls—which results in a long list of positive outcomes, such as more access to family planning, more productive farms, lower incidents of disease— is a particularly effective, though often overlooked, way of fighting climate change Read Full Story

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How your business can help fight coronavirus: One brand’s pivot to making masks

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The brand collaborated with a doctor to create a fabric mask with an insert for a HEPA filter. Ellen Bennett felt like she was flailing last week. The owner of Hedley & Bennett worried about how quickly the coronavirus was spreading and was concerned about how she was going to keep paying her 30 employees if the economy shut down. Then, on Friday, she saw that designer Christian Siriano had started making masks to tackle the shortage of medical supplies. “It was like someone flung a brick at my head,” Bennett says. “I’ve always been a wake-up-and-fight kind of a girl. And I thought, ‘This is fucking game time.'” Read Full Story

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Should moms get $2,400 a month? This ‘Marshall Plan’ says yes, and it’s a great idea

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Reshma Saujani, the founder of Girls Who Code, is proposing broad action to compensate American mothers for their labor. She’s not alone. Should moms get a fat monthly check from the government? Reshma Saujani, the founder of Girls Who Code, proposes just that, in an opinion piece getting a lot of buzz this week. “In the last year, we’ve confirmed that in the eyes of policy makers, [mothers’] labor has no economic value whatsoever—that it’s worth exactly zero dollars,” she writes. Read Full Story

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Why visual design has never been more important for educating the masses

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Graphic designer Denishia Macon talks to Doreen Lorenzo about design’s power to educate, brands chiming in on social justice movements, and the challenges facing Black designers today. Denishia Macon is the lead graphic designer and design consultant for Macon Designs . She spoke to Doreen Lorenzo for Designing Women , a series of interviews with brilliant women in the design industry. Read Full Story

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2 women won the Nobel for CRISPR, but the battle for its patent rages on

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Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier won the Nobel Prize for figuring out how to use biological mechanisms to edit genes, but an ongoing legal battle makes their win complicated. This week Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier were awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a process to edit DNA known as CRISPR Cas-9. But the announcement, which comes amid a years-long battle over who owns the methodology to make genomic edits, is bittersweet. Read Full Story

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