LGBTQ employees regularly face discrimination at work. Here are 5 steps companies can take to be more inclusive

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A new McKinsey & Co. report found that companies’ stated commitment to LGBTQ+ equity hasn’t yet translated into results. In a profound victory for the LGBTQ+ community, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled to protect LGBTQ+ employees against workplace discrimination based on one’s sexual orientation or gender identity. This recent, stunning, unexpected, and long overdue victory gives millions of LGBTQ+ workers the civil rights protections they had sought for decades. Read Full Story

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‘Our company is unapologetically American Chinese’: How Panda Express is fighting COVID-19 racism

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As the COVID-19 pandemic hits the United States, the cofounders and co-CEOs of Panda Express are confronting economic turmoil and rising xenophobia at the same time. For Fast Company’s new Restaurant Diaries series, we’re asking chefs, restaurateurs, and food-world employees to take readers inside their businesses and lives at this critical moment for the industry. Read Full Story

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Here’s what Amazon says it’s doing to keep warehouse workers safe from COVID-19

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Facing backlash, the company will offer face masks and temperature checks for staff in all of its U.S. and European warehouses and Whole Foods stores. Amazon is rolling out new measures to protect its employees from the coronavirus outbreak. By early next week, the company will offer face masks and temperature checks for staff in all of its U.S. and European warehouses and Whole Foods stores, and it will install artificial intelligence software to its camera systems to monitor whether workers congregate too closely. Read Full Story

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Paycheck Protection Program rules could get easier under House bill: Here’s what it would do

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Lawmakers are hoping to resolve some of the biggest complaints about the PPP loan program, which is supposed to help small businesses affected by COVID-19. With companies and employees still suffering across the country as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, the U.S. House of Representatives yesterday passed a new bill meant to address one of the biggest complaints about the federal loan program for small businesses—how they can spend the money. Under the bill, which passed the House almost unanimously and will head to the Senate next week, some restrictions for the Paycheck Protection Program, or PPP, would be relaxed. Here’s a breakdown of what would change: Read Full Story

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Brown is using a new app from Google’s Verily to bring students back to campus

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After setting up COVID-19 testing pop-ups in 13 states, Verily’s “Healthy at Work” program to aims to help employers, including Brown University, manage a return to work. The Alphabet company Verily is helping Brown University bring students and teachers back to campus amid the pandemic. Today the company launched a program called Healthy at Work aimed at employers that will help employees self-monitor symptoms, make testing recommendations, and determine a person’s eligibility for going to work. Read Full Story

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Brown is using a new app from Alphabet’s Verily to bring teachers back to campus

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After setting up COVID-19 testing pop-ups in 13 states, Verily’s “Healthy at Work” program aims to help employers, including Brown University, manage a return to work. The Alphabet company Verily is helping Brown University bring teachers back to campus amid the pandemic. Today the company launched a program called Healthy at Work, aimed at employers, that will help employees self-monitor symptoms, make testing recommendations, and determine a person’s eligibility for going to work. Read Full Story

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I’m a tech CEO. Here’s why I’m not taking a salary during COVID-19

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As the founder and CEO of the fintech company Gravity Payments, I’ve decided to prioritize my employees’ and clients’ well-being over my own compensation during the coronavirus crisis. In early March, as the coronavirus arrived in the United States and businesses began shutting down, our company started losing money fast. We’re a credit card processor that works primarily with small and midsize businesses such as restaurants, retails shops, and independent clinics, which means our revenue is directly tied to theirs. By the end of the month, we were down 55% from expectations and losing $30,000 a day. Read Full Story

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An epidemiologist on what steps to take if you are preparing to reopen your business

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Balance an awareness of your community’s conditions alongside the the needs of your employees. From there, break down the specifics of each precaution to make sure you are being as thorough as possible to protect every individual’s health. In the past week, many states took the first steps to reopen their economies. For some other locations, the reopening of their businesses may still be months away. Read Full Story

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Microsoft is giving parents 12 weeks’ paid parental leave

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Microsoft will extend three months’ paid parental leave to all full-time employees. After a month of watching employees juggle 30 hours a day worth of work, childcare, homeschooling, and housework, Microsoft said that it will extend three months’ paid parental leave to all full-time employees. The policy follows the announcement earlier this week that Washington State schools will be closed for the rest of the school year (the state superintendent mused that school closures may continue into fall). Read Full Story

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Vermont sues Clearview AI over “unethical” facial screen scraping

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Vermont has sued Clearview AI, the controversial face recognition company that’s said to have built up a huge database of facial images of everyday people. Vermont’s attorney general sued Clearview AI in state court on Tuesday, saying the controversial face recognition company’s use of images scraped from the internet violates its consumer protection and data brokerage laws. The state is seeking a court order requiring that Clearview stop collecting photos of state residents and destroy the data and photos of Vermonters it already has on file. Read Full Story

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