Sheryl Sandberg says Facebook is making changes to fight hate speech—but not because of ad boycott

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Despite saying it’s because it’s “the right thing to do,” Sandberg and Mark Zuckerberg are meeting with Stop Hate for Profit leaders. if(typeof(jQuery)=="function"){(function($){$.fn.fitVids=function(){}})(jQuery)}; jwplayer('jwplayer_6CSz0sUg_G2hQKLvX_div').setup( {"playlist":"https:\/\/content.jwplatform.com\/feeds\/6CSz0sUg.json","ph":2} ); On June 17, civil rights groups such as the NAACP and the Anti-Defamation League, as well as Color of Change, Free Press, Common Sense, and Sleeping Giants, launched the Stop Hate for Profit campaign, calling for a boycott of Facebook advertising to force the platform to stem the sheer amount of hate speech and divisive content on the platform and halt its long-standing tolerance of problematic posts by President Trump and his campaign. Read Full Story

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Facebook’s Zuckerberg backs Trump over Dorsey in Twitter fact-check feud

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Zuckerberg told Fox News that social media companies shouldn’t be the “arbiters of truth.” Yesterday President Trump unloaded a string of attacks on social media companies in response to Twitter issuing its first-ever fact-check on one of his tweets. That tweet by the president claimed, “There is NO WAY (ZERO!) that Mail-In Ballots will be anything less than substantially fraudulent. Mail boxes will be robbed, ballots will be forged & even illegally printed out & fraudulently signed.” Read Full Story

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Facebook yanks Trump and Pence ads that included a triangle symbol used by Nazi Germany

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The president’s ads included the red, inverted triangle used by Nazi Germany. Facebook deactivated a series of ads and organic posts from President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence today because they included a symbol used by the Nazis. The ads and posts were removed when The Washington Post contacted Facebook, after they were seen by Facebook users as many as 1.45 million times. Read Full Story

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How Facebook became “the most Chinese company In Silicon Valley”

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In this excerpt from Alex Kantrowitz’s new book, “Always Day One,” he describes how Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg responded to the threat posed by Snapchat. At around the same time Facebook was working out its News Feed issues, an upstart messaging app called Snapchat — led by the brash Stanford graduate Evan Spiegel — built a feature called Stories, which let people share photos and videos with friends that disappeared in a day. Snapchat’s users loved how Stories gave them a carefree way to post (in contrast with Facebook, where your posts would go to everyone and stick around forever) and the app’s usage exploded. Spiegel, who once spurned a $3 billion acquisition offer from Zuckerberg, was now hitting him where it hurt. In the zero-sum game of social media, where time spent on one platform is time not spent on another, Spiegel had the energy, the sharing, and was driving …

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