If COVID-19 pushes people to the suburbs, how can we make them more environmentally friendly?

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As people move out of dense cities and into sprawling suburbs, their carbon footprint could actually increase. Four miles from downtown Austin is a suburb that doesn’t much resemble the 1950s archetype of big family houses behind white-picket fences, wide streets, and endless sprawl. Instead, Mueller, Texas , is a modern, mixed-use, equitable, eco-conscious community, built on the lot of an old decommissioned airport, comprised of a mix of solar-ready single homes and apartment blocks, shops, restaurants, offices, a 30-acre park and jogging trails, a museum and an open-air amphitheater, and the highest number of electric cars per capita in the country. It’s described as “an alternative to land-consumptive and automobile-dependent development patterns throughout the region.” Read Full Story

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In the new age of remote work, people under 30 might finally kill email

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A new survey from Creative Strategies found that younger workers are more likely to use a unique mix of apps for collaboration. Working from home is not for everyone. Yet anyone who still has a job and is able has been thrust into it. From the early days of the work-from-home mandate I have been watching how this distributed teamwork is impacting both organizations and employees. Read Full Story

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The high-tech arsenal we need to fight the coronavirus

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As officials scramble to find basic protective gear and the life-or-death equipment patients need, researchers are racing to discover drugs that could fight the virus. The best way to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus is old-fashioned—a mix of social distancing and isolating people who are vulnerable—but health providers are also turning to an array of old and new technologies to combat the disease and its effects. Read Full Story

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Snap has registered 750,000 people to vote in 2020. Here’s its plan to keep going

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Teaming up with artist Mark Bradford, Snapchat wants to boost its voter registration numbers even higher. 2020 is poised to be the most important election of our lifetime, and it’s happening during a pandemic—taking the normal tools of stump speeches, rallies, and voter registration drives out of the mix. But where those analog traditions have gone by the wayside, new digital ones are taking their place. Read Full Story

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Beauty brands were quick to tout diversity during summer protests, but the commitment was short-lived

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Beauty brands posted more images of models with dark skin tones during the BLM protests, then immediately reverted to the mix of largely light-skinned models. Over the summer, in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd, millions of people protested in cities across the country, demanding police reform and more accountability. Companies scrambled to reframe their work and put out statements that kept pace with public sentiment. Read Full Story

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I am a trans CEO. This is why the Supreme Court anti-discrimination ruling was a day long in the making

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The author and financial sector exec discusses how many from her close circle began rethinking their views after the SCOTUS ruling protecting LGBTQ+ workers. As a businessperson, I generally do not mix business and politics. My dad always told me that politics, religion, and business do not make good bedfellows, but the recent events around the country are compelling me to do so. We have an administration that, despite promises to the contrary, has continued to reverse protections affecting countless people. For members of the LGBTQ community, the latest blow came a few weeks ago when several health insurance restrictions were announced, specifically aimed at transgender Americans—right in the middle of Pride Month , tellingly enough. Read Full Story

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“It’s an incredible experiment”: Banning cars in cities stirs controversy—and has mixed results

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Converting streets slowly, and involving every member of the community, can lead to long-term closures that promote vibrant city life without cars. Streets are the realm of the automobile these days, but that hasn’t always been the case. Before cars and parking spots took over the space between our buildings and homes, streets were much more diverse: Photos from the pre-car era show people on foot and bike intermixed with horses, wagons, pushcarts, vendors, streetcars, and more. Today, the ubiquity of the motorized vehicle and the auto-dependency of much of modern cities has slashed the street’s diversity basically down to the car alone. Read Full Story

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