This is what a zero-emissions city looks like

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Oslo has an ambitious goal to cut emissions by 95% by 2030. Here’s how it will do it. On streets in downtown Oslo, former parking spaces are now bike lanes and parklets with benches and gardens. Since the city made the change, converting hundreds of parking spaces in 2017 and 2018 , car traffic has steeply dropped, falling 28% by 2019. At rush hour in the city center, people walk, bike, and wait for trams and buses instead of sitting in traffic. Read Full Story

More

UN Secretary-General: Every country and every company needs to make a plan for net-zero emissions

{ object.primary_image.title }}

In a speech, U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres called on the world to commit to strong climate change goals now. Hundreds of businesses, investors, cities, countries, and universities now plan to reach net-zero emissions by 2050, meaning that any of their greenhouse gas emissions that remain by then will be offset by carbon removal. Some are moving faster: Microsoft and Ikea, for example, plan to be carbon negative—they’ll remove more carbon than they their operations produce—by 2030. In a speech today, U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres said that every organization and government now needs to set a similar goal. Read Full Story

More

Walmart says it will reach zero emissions by 2040—without using any offsets

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Corporate climate commitments often involve paying into environmental projects to make up for an inability to truly achieve a clean footprint. The retail giant just set the bar higher. When companies set targets to get to zero emissions, they often aim for “net zero,” using carbon-offset projects like tree planting to make up for the fact that they haven’t fully stopped polluting. A new goal from Walmart goes further: By 2040, the company plans to reach zero emissions across its global operations without using any offsets. In other words, it’s aiming for real zero, not net zero. Read Full Story

More

PepsiCo says it will reach net-zero emissions by 2040

{ object.primary_image.title }}

In two decades, the giant food and beverage company plans a major shift to renewables and changes throughout its supply chain. As one of the largest food and beverage companies in the world, PepsiCo has a correspondingly massive carbon footprint—it generated 57 million metric tons in 2019. But by 2040, 10 years ahead of what’s necessary to meet the goals of the Paris climate agreement, it plans to reach net-zero emissions. Read Full Story

More

The U.S. can get to net-zero emissions by 2050. Here’s how

{ object.primary_image.title }}

The Biden administration is expected to announce 2050 as the deadline for decarbonizing the economy. A new report looks at how we can get there. Dozens of countries, including Japan, the U.K., and Germany, plan to hit “net-zero” by 2050, meaning that any greenhouse gas emissions that still remain will be offset by carbon captured by methods like reforestation or direct air capture . China, the world’s largest emitter, plans to get to net-zero by 2060. When Biden takes office, the U.S. is expected to make a pledge to reach the goal by 2050. Can we do it? Read Full Story

More

This Al Gore-supported project uses AI to track the world’s emissions in near real-time

{ object.primary_image.title }}

“We intend to trace all significant manmade greenhouse gas emissions and assign responsibility for them.” As the world tries to figure out how to flatten the climate curve—cutting global emissions in half by the end of the decade, and reaching net-zero emissions by the middle of the century—one challenge is how to track current emissions from every power plant, farm, and other source on the planet. A new project called the Climate TRACE Coalition plans to use satellite imagery and AI to track those emissions in near real-time, even if they’re not being reported by the source. Read Full Story

More

Unilever is investing $1.1 billion in a new climate fund—and hopes to reach net zero emissions by 2039

{ object.primary_image.title }}

The goal is to hit the benchmarks set by the Paris Climate Agreement far earlier than the 2050 deadline. Unilever, one of the largest consumer goods companies in the world, had a carbon footprint equivalent to about 60 million metric tons of CO2 in 2019. But by 2039, the company plans to shrink the carbon footprint of its products to net zero, 11 years before the deadline set by the Paris Climate Agreement. Read Full Story

More

Subscribe to our newsletter

Join our newsletter and never miss out trending marketing news.

HitcountVariables(pk=9187, ajax_url='/api/hit/ajax/', hits='1')