How to prepare your home, your workplace, and yourself for a pandemic

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Stock up on food, work from home, and make it clear workers who are sick will be supported—not fired. Roughly a month after China launched the largest quarantine in human history, with more than 700 million people under full or partial lockdown as of last week, in an attempt at containment of the new coronavirus, the virus is now quickly spreading in other countries, including South Korea and Italy. On Tuesday, federal officials in the U.S. said that it’s not a matter of if the coronavirus will begin to spread in American communities, but when. San Francisco declared a state of emergency . No one knows, yet, how bad it might get. But here’s what individuals and companies can do to prepare. Read Full Story

Read Full Article on Fast Company

How prepared is your city for COVID-19? This impact tool measures readiness at the local level

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Is your city or town ready for an influx of COVID-19 hospitalizations? A new impact planning tool from Esri might give you an idea. In New York City and other areas heavily impacted by the coronavirus pandemic, hospitals and healthcare systems are already becoming overwhelmed , and that scenario is likely to play out in cities and towns across the country as COVID-19 spreads. Read Full Story

More

Stuck at home because of coronavirus? How to get your art and design fix from your couch

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Just because coronavirus has you avoiding public spaces doesn’t mean you can’t get cultured from home. Over the past month, cities around the world have asked people to curtail travel, practice social distancing, and work from home in an effort to stop the spread of the coronavirus. As confirmed cases continue to increase in the U.S., American cities are recommending these same practices. Staying home (whether you’re self-quarantining or just avoiding public spaces) can be incredibly isolating. But it doesn’t have to be—from virtual museum tours to podcasts, there are a number of ways to get a culture fix from the comfort and safety of home. Read Full Story

More

How to protect your work-from-home computer from cyberattacks

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Like your mind and body, your home technology is vulnerable to dangerous viruses. Everywhere across the country, you can hear people murmuring “Happy Birthday” as they thoroughly scrub their hands to combat the spread of COVID-19. However, though many people are practicing good personal hygiene to protect themselves from the coronavirus , many are not taking the proper steps toward cybersecurity hygiene to protect their work-from-home computer from its own outbreak. Read Full Story

More

Stop watching Netflix, and tackle these 8 tech projects instead

{ object.primary_image.title }}

From organizing digital photos to repurposing old tech, here’s some ideas on how to use your free time during the coronavirus lockdown. If you’re heeding the advice of public health officials and staying home to slow the spread of coronavirus, you might have a lot more idle time than you did a few weeks ago. But that doesn’t mean you have to spend it all binge-watching Netflix or playing Fortnite . Read Full Story

More

Got kids? Try these tips for working from home while they’re with you

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Even if you’ve worked from home for years and have the perfect setup, your plan probably never included family members—much less kids. With social distancing helping to slow the spread of coronavirus, many families are suddenly finding that not only do they have to work from home, but their kids are at home too. From daycare to colleges, families are learning how to work and play together all day, every day. Read Full Story

More

What gyms are doing to prevent coronavirus

{ object.primary_image.title }}

In preparation for an outbreak, we’ve heard about preemptive plans for people to work from home, but less about working out from home. Gyms are generally not very hygienic places. Your trusty treadmill may have 74 times as much bacteria as a water faucet. And those free weights you’re curling with may have 362 times more bacteria than toilet seats. Read Full Story

More

The coronavirus crisis is hitting childcare workers especially hard

{ object.primary_image.title }}

As families try to limit their exposure to coronavirus, the childcare industry is becoming collateral damage. Five daycare workers and nannies share how they’re making ends meet. Between school closures and shelter-in-place orders to curb the spread of COVID-19, parents across the country are now quarantined with their children. For those who have the ability to work from home, this has meant juggling a variety of roles in addition to their full-time jobs. Read Full Story

More

Subscribe to our newsletter

Join our newsletter and never miss out trending marketing news.

HitcountVariables(pk=1177, ajax_url='/api/hit/ajax/', hits='3')