How social distancing could make public transportation more bike-friendly

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Can socially distant transportation design make it easier than ever to incorporate cycling into your commute? The designers at PriestmanGoode reckon so. As people return to work, transit systems will need to do a better job of supporting bike ridership, which has already grown substantially across Europe and, to a lesser extent, the U.S . during the COVID-19 era. And no wonder: People cooped up at home are looking for a fun, safe way to get some fresh air, and an alternative to the close confines of public transportation. One design firm has released a concept that makes commuting by bike a little bit easier. Read Full Story

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This clever attachment makes any bike an e-bike in just seconds

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If you don’t want a whole new e-bike, you can just carry this e-bike attachment around for the biggest hills. When product designer Somnath Ray started commuting to work by bike to lower his carbon footprint, most of the ride was easy—but a few steep hills were so challenging that he realized that the effort might discourage other people from making the same transportation choice. He started working on a new solution: a simple attachment that temporarily converts any bicycle into an electric bike. Read Full Story

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London is transforming its center into a car-free zone to create more distancing when it reopens

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“We will need many more Londoners to walk and cycle to make this work.” Before the pandemic, roughly two million people rode London’s subway system every day, often packed on crowded cars at rush hour. As the city tries to figure out how workers can safely commute when more businesses reopen, it wants people to avoid public transit when possible—but not to switch to driving. To help make it easier to bike and walk to work, the city is creating a massive car-free zone in the center of the city. Read Full Story

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Coronavirus is causing a biking surge—can it last when cities open up again?

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Biking is suddenly the safest and most convenient way to get around a lot of cities—and cities are responding by making it easier to bike. But when people can start driving to work again, will everything go backwards? As the coronavirus crisis has shut down some public transit service and taken so many cars off roads that the air has visibly cleared in cities such as Los Angeles, bikes have emerged as the right tool for a pandemic—a way to quickly get around cities and get exercise while staying a safe distance from everyone else. Read Full Story

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Emissions dropped during COVID-19. Here’s what cities can do to keep them from rising

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It’s time to double down on electric vehicles. COVID-19 upended our daily lives and shifted our relationship to transportation, although we don’t yet know how trends that started during the pandemic will play out. Will people forsake public transit for cars? Will street closures continue, creating more permanent space for walking, biking, and outdoor restaurants? Will work-from-home continue to be the norm, cutting down on commuting hours—and emissions—in the process? Read Full Story

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Need some fresh air? The best road and off-road bikes for getting outside, running errands, and even commuting to work

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Starting at $500, these bikes will get you on the road (or trail) in no time These days, biking is an unsung hero for those trying to get some low-impact exercise, fresh air, and the hell away from Ubers and public transit. FC reported earlier this month that biking has ballooned in cities across the world. In Bogata, car lanes have been shut down to give cyclists more space. In Philadelphia, bike traffic increased so steeply in some areas that the city temporarily closed a stretch of a major street to cars. The use of bike-share programs doubled in London, and New York saw a sharp uptick as well. Biking is becoming an increasingly accessible outlet for recreationalists and commuters alike. And it just might stay that way. So if you’re in the market for a two-wheeled ride or the bells and whistles that go along with it, we’ve rounded …

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This app measures your carbon footprint in real-time as you shop (or change your habits)

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Changing your habits isn’t going to solve climate change alone, but it can help. Joro makes the benefits of your changes visible—and suggests new ones. One of the reasons that people are often slow to act on climate change is the enormity of the crisis: It’s hard to know where to begin. It’s a systemic problem, and one person acting alone isn’t going to rebuild the electric grid or the transportation system. But there’s still a lot that individual action can achieve. An app called Joro is designed to make it easier to understand—and manage—your own carbon footprint. Read Full Story

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Instead of police randomly enforcing traffic laws, cameras and smart design could make safer streets

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Part of reallocating police budgets could involve taking the bias out of traffic stops and instead doing real work to change our streets. In New York City, police issue more criminal summonses for cycling on the sidewalk in Black and Latino neighborhoods than in white ones. Those neighborhoods, it turns out, tend to lack protected bike lanes, and research has shown that when a protected bike lane is available, the prevalence of sidewalk cycling plummets by as much as 94%. What if the money spent on that sort of policing was used instead to build safe bicycling infrastructure, so people didn’t feel like it was necessary to ride on the sidewalk in the first place? Read Full Story

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The Netherlands is transforming old ashtrays into bike charging stations

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In the Netherlands, lung cancer gives way for cardio-friendly commutes. There are few less appealing items in the universe than the ashtray. It’s literally a container for soot, carcinogens, and the occasional whiff of menthol. But in train stations across the Netherlands, the lanky, six-foot smoke poles are something of an architectural icon. So even as 300 of the poles were removed from stations last October when public smoking at railways became illegal , railroad owner ProRail has securely stored the poles, wanting them preserved for a new purpose. Read Full Story

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Imagine a transcontinental network of protected bike paths

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“Our vision is an intercity network that people could bike and walk to destinations across the country.” Under an elevated rail line in Miami, a new park will open this fall with a 10-mile path dedicated to walking and biking. It’s an infrastructure improvement for Miami cyclists, but it’s also part of a larger, interstate network of trails that will eventually make it possible to ride from Florida to Maine with little interaction with cars. And even that enormous project is itself just a small part of an even bigger dream: a network of protected bike lanes connecting cities across the country, making it possible to bike from city to city—and ocean to ocean—safely. Read Full Story

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