Imagine a transcontinental network of protected bike paths

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“Our vision is an intercity network that people could bike and walk to destinations across the country.” Under an elevated rail line in Miami, a new park will open this fall with a 10-mile path dedicated to walking and biking. It’s an infrastructure improvement for Miami cyclists, but it’s also part of a larger, interstate network of trails that will eventually make it possible to ride from Florida to Maine with little interaction with cars. And even that enormous project is itself just a small part of an even bigger dream: a network of protected bike lanes connecting cities across the country, making it possible to bike from city to city—and ocean to ocean—safely. Read Full Story

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This is what a zero-emissions city looks like

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Oslo has an ambitious goal to cut emissions by 95% by 2030. Here’s how it will do it. On streets in downtown Oslo, former parking spaces are now bike lanes and parklets with benches and gardens. Since the city made the change, converting hundreds of parking spaces in 2017 and 2018 , car traffic has steeply dropped, falling 28% by 2019. At rush hour in the city center, people walk, bike, and wait for trams and buses instead of sitting in traffic. Read Full Story

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Need some fresh air? The best road and off-road bikes for getting outside, running errands, and even commuting to work

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Starting at $500, these bikes will get you on the road (or trail) in no time These days, biking is an unsung hero for those trying to get some low-impact exercise, fresh air, and the hell away from Ubers and public transit. FC reported earlier this month that biking has ballooned in cities across the world. In Bogata, car lanes have been shut down to give cyclists more space. In Philadelphia, bike traffic increased so steeply in some areas that the city temporarily closed a stretch of a major street to cars. The use of bike-share programs doubled in London, and New York saw a sharp uptick as well. Biking is becoming an increasingly accessible outlet for recreationalists and commuters alike. And it just might stay that way. So if you’re in the market for a two-wheeled ride or the bells and whistles that go along with it, we’ve rounded …

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Austin, Texas, just voted to spend $7 billion on a transportation revolution

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The Texas capital will build a 31-station rail system, rapid bus routes, and bike lanes to get more people out of cars. Austin, Texas, where drivers spend an average of 104 hours stuck in traffic each year, is a city built around the car. But after passing two new propositions, the city now plans to invest more than $7 billion in a new transit system, and another $460 million in new infrastructure centered on walking and biking. Read Full Story

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The pandemic pushed cities to take back their streets from cars. Will they keep them in 2021?

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Across the world, as COVID-19 reshaped people’s routines, cities quickly converted streets to bike lanes, pedestrian areas, and places for outdoor dining. As the pandemic ends, it will require a lot of political will to prevent the status quo from returning. Until recently, the Rue de Rivoli, a major street that cuts across the center of Paris, was filled with cars. But when the pandemic forced the city to shut down in the spring, the majority of the road was turned over to people on bikes. On some days, as many as 20,000 cyclists use the street. But as the end of the pandemic draws closer, the change is going to become permanent. Read Full Story

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Do bike lanes actually make cyclists safer?

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It depends. And design choices have everything to do with it. In 2004, I was working a summer job as a bike messenger in Boston when I was struck by a car in an intersection. I ended up in the hospital, undergoing extensive surgery to have a metal plate inserted from my left wrist up my forearm—I can still feel it whenever I type. Lying there on the operating room table, I wondered if this would have happened if there were better protections for cyclists. Read Full Story

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This massive wildlife crossing will help protect wildlife from LA drivers on the 101

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The project will break ground in 2021 and let the city’s mountain lions access more habitat without risking getting hit by cars. For mountain lions living in Los Angeles—and yes, mountain lions do manage to survive in the second-largest city in the U.S.—the 101 freeway is a major barrier to their daily routines. The same is true for other wildlife. But plans to build a massive wildlife crossing over a 10-lane stretch of the freeway just north of the city are now in the final phase of design and engineering. The project will be the largest bridge of its kind in the world. Read Full Story

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Your next bike could be a Porsche

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The company is offering two new battery-powered bikes as it releases its latest EV. When you think of Porsche, you almost certainly are picturing a sleek sports car. But now the German car manufacturer is trying out something completely different: an electric bicycle. Read Full Story

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This company wants to bring NASA’s airless tires to your bike

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No more flats would save a lot of wasted rubber. While bicycling doesn’t produce any pollution, every time you get a flat tire while out on a ride, that rubber tube ends up in a landfill. By one estimate , riders in San Francisco alone throw out more than 100,000 tubes every year, enough to wrap the Golden Gate bridge 33 times. The SMART Tire Company hopes to make flat tires, and all that rubber waste, a thing of the past, with airless bike tires that use technology originally invented by NASA. Read Full Story

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How cities are reshaping streets to prepare for life after lockdown

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How to prepare for a future where people can’t crowd into trains and buses? Make sure you get more bikers—not more drivers. As the daily coronavirus death toll slowly falls in Italy and cities in the country make plans for reopening, Milan is beginning to transform 22 miles of local streets, adding temporary bike lanes and wider sidewalks, and lowering the speed limit. In Berlin, some parking spots have also become pop-up bike lanes. Paris is fast-tracking long-distance bike lanes that connect suburbs to the city center. And in Brussels, on May 4, the city center will become a priority zone for people on bikes and on foot. Read Full Story

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