Heathrow’s planned new runway just got canceled—thanks to the Paris Agreement

{ object.primary_image.title }}

For the first time ever, the Paris climate agreement has formed the basis of a major court ruling. The project to expand London’s Heathrow airport was first proposed in 2009, and it has had a turbulent journey since. It was initially backed by a Labour government, canceled a year later, revived, then backed by a Conservative government in 2018. Proponents have touted the plan as a source of extra jobs, additional air routes, and fewer delays. The U.K. Department of Transport has estimated an economic benefit of £61 billion, or $79 billion, over the next 60 years. Read Full Story

Read Full Article on Fast Company

Unilever is investing $1.1 billion in a new climate fund—and hopes to reach net zero emissions by 2039

{ object.primary_image.title }}

The goal is to hit the benchmarks set by the Paris Climate Agreement far earlier than the 2050 deadline. Unilever, one of the largest consumer goods companies in the world, had a carbon footprint equivalent to about 60 million metric tons of CO2 in 2019. But by 2039, the company plans to shrink the carbon footprint of its products to net zero, 11 years before the deadline set by the Paris Climate Agreement. Read Full Story

More

Banks won’t stop funneling billions of dollars into the fossil fuel industry

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Bank financing for companies that are planning new coal, oil, and gas extraction increased 40% from 2018 to 2019, despite warnings that we need to stop burning these fuels. Despite their claimed support for the Paris Climate Agreement, major global banks have not only continued to pour billions of dollars into the fossil fuel industry since 2015, they financed more fossil fuel extraction and infrastructure companies in 2019 than the year prior—funneling billions into new coal, oil, and gas projects even as experts warn that we need to stop burning these fuels. Read Full Story

More

What environmental rule rollbacks will Trump try to sneak through before the end?

{ object.primary_image.title }}

After four years of allowing more pollution and emissions, the Trump administration has 10 weeks left to accomplish its deregulatory agenda. The Midnight Watch Project is keeping a list, so it can all be fixed after. President-elect Joseph Biden has big plans for climate policy, from rejoining the Paris climate agreement to decarbonizing the electric grid , but these initiatives won’t begin until his inauguration on January 20, 2021. In the meantime, the Trump administration still has 10 weeks (and counting) in office. In the past four years, the administration has already rolled back hundreds of rules designed to do everything from preventing the release of methane from oil wells to limiting how much mercury a coal power plant can emit. In the lame duck period, it could accelerate plans to do more before inauguration day. Read Full Story

More

What Biden could do on climate—even with a Republican Senate

{ object.primary_image.title }}

The election hasn’t been called, but should Biden win but not control the Senate, he can still put us back in the Paris agreement—and push change via regulations and executive action. On November 4, Trump officially withdrew from the Paris climate agreement . If Biden wins, on his first day in office on January 20, he plans to rejoin it—a first step in setting the U.S. on a path to tackle climate change, which Biden has called the “number one issue facing humanity.” Read Full Story

More

On top of everything else, the U.S. withdraws from the Paris climate agreement tomorrow

{ object.primary_image.title }}

What happens next depends on the results of the election. Three years after the Trump administration began the process of withdrawing from the Paris climate agreement—the landmark international deal to limit global warming—the U.S. has now reached the date when it can officially pull out: November 4, the day after the election. But depending on the results, the withdrawal might not last long. Read Full Story

More

How COVID relief funds could boost a green recovery

{ object.primary_image.title }}

It would cost around $1.4 trillion per year over the next five years in clean-energy investment to meet the goals of the Paris climate agreement. That money could fuel a global economic recovery at the same time. As of late summer, governments around the world had pledged $12.2 trillion of relief in response to the coronavirus pandemic. That’s around 15% of global gross domestic product , three times larger than government spending put forward during and after the 2008-2009 global financial crisis and enough for every adult in the world to receive a $2,000 check. Read Full Story

More

The enormous COVID-19 recovery plans show there’s money to solve climate change

{ object.primary_image.title }}

We’re spending 15% of global GDP on one crisis. What would happen if we treated the climate crisis the same way? The amount of funding that governments are throwing at the economic recovery from COVID-19—more than $12 trillion announced so far, or 15% of the global GDP—is unprecedented. How much of that would it take to put the global energy system on track to meet the goals of the Paris climate agreement? With only a fraction of the pandemic recovery money, we could fund the transition to clean energy. Read Full Story

More

Spain creates a universal minimum income targeted at 2.3 million people

{ object.primary_image.title }}

As the pandemic continues to destroy the economy, the government guarantees no one will earn less than about $500 a month. With the coronavirus pandemic exacerbating the most vulnerable people’s financial struggles, the Spanish government has decided to implement what it’s calling a national minimum income, ensuring that people in the nation’s 850,000 lowest-income households receive at least roughly $500 a month in income. The plan aims to reach 2.3 million people and is expected to cost the government about €3 billion a year. Read Full Story

More

The coronavirus is wiping out tech conferences, and that’s not all bad

{ object.primary_image.title }}

As tech giants cancel their developer events in favor of virtual education, more people might get access to the information they need. Is 2020 going to be the year all of Big Tech’s developer conferences got canceled? It’s looking like it might well be. In the wake of the coronavirus, the in-person versions of Facebook’s F8 and Google’s Cloud Next have been canceled and are set to be replaced with virtual events that will be streamed to participants. Google has also canceled Google I/O , and has been less specific about any plans to host an online version. Read Full Story

More

Subscribe to our newsletter

Join our newsletter and never miss out trending marketing news.

HitcountVariables(pk=1777, ajax_url='/api/hit/ajax/', hits='3')