Diversity and Inclusion in SEO: BIPOC and LGBTQ+ SEOs Share Their Experiences

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Posted by NicoleDeLeon People around the world are having important discussions about systemic racism, overt and covert bias, and how we can all do better. Understanding the problem is the first step. To get a sense of conditions within the SEO community, we asked people to take our Diversity and Inclusion in SEO survey as part of our ongoing project to study the state of SEO . Due to the subject matter and the way we reached out, our respondents were not a snapshot of the industry as a whole. We were very pleased to have 326 SEOs complete the survey, including a significant number of female, BIPOC, and LGBTQ+ participants. These are important voices that need to be heard, but as we analyzed the data, we were careful not to generalize the industry as a whole without accounting for potential sampling bias. We addressed this by looking at groups separately — straight white cisgender men, BIPOC women, LGBTQ+ men, and so forth. We recognize that intersectionality is common. Many of the SEOs who shared their stories with us don’t fit neatly into a single group. We addressed that by counting people in each category that applied to them, so a gay Black man’s answers would be factored into both the LGBTQ+ and BIPOC analyses. Who participated? Of the 326 SEOs who participated, 231 respondents (70.9%) described themselves as white. Among the rest, 32 SEOs described themselves as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish; 28 Black or African American; 18 Asian or Asian American; 11 Middle Eastern or North African; eight Indian or South Asian; four Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander; and three American Indian or Alaska Native. (Some people were counted in more than one category.) Our respondents included 203 SEOs who identify as women (including one transgender woman), 109 who identify as men (including two transgender men), and 11 who consider themselves nonbinary, genderqueer, two-spirit, or gender nonconformist. Three people preferred not to share their gender. With regard to sexual orientation, 72.8% described themselves as heterosexual, 25.2% as LGBTQ+, and 2% preferred not to say. About two-thirds (218 SEOs) of the participants were from the U.S., and about one in 10 (35 SEOs) were from the United Kingdom. The rest came from 26 other countries across the globe. The average age was 34.5 with 6.9 years of experience in SEO. (Please see the methodology section at the end for …

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How Big Is the Gender Gap Between Men and Women in SEO?

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Posted by NicoleDeLeon To anyone working in SEO, it’s fairly evident that this is a male-dominated industry. Although there are powerful women SEOs in the field (like Moz CEO Sarah Bird, for example), if you glance at a conference speaker lineup or peruse the bylines on search-related blogs, you’ll see that those who identify as female are few and far between. A recent list of the 140 most influential SEOs featured 104 men and just 36 women. So how big is the gender gap? And how does it translate to tangible things like pay and job titles? To find out, we mined the data from our State of SEO 2020 survey , which featured 652 SEOs in 51 countries. Here are some of the things we learned. But first, a mea culpa. If SEOs who identify as women have an uphill climb in this industry, there’s no doubt that female-identifying …

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We need to stop ‘untitling’ and ‘uncredentialing’ professional women

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Amy Diehl, PhD, and Leanne Dzubinski, PhD, propose new terms for an old practice of omitting titles for women while using them for men that diminishes women’s authority and credibility. The inauguration marked a new presidential administration and a couple of other important firsts: Vice President Kamala Harris became the first woman and the first Black and South Asian to hold that office. First Lady Dr. Jill Biden became the first president’s wife to hold a paying job outside the White House. Despite these women’s career achievements, they’ve both been subjected to a common form of workplace gender bias that continues to play out in many organizations. Read Full Story

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Diversity and inclusion in search marketing and advertising; Monday’s daily brief

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Search Engine Land’s daily brief features daily insights, news, tips, and essential bits of wisdom for today’s search marketer. If you would like to read this before the rest of the internet does, sign up here to get it delivered to your inbox daily. Good morning, Marketers, and let’s talk about analytics. I was watching a talk from Andy Crestodina last week where he said that so many people forget the root of analytics is in “analysis.” We’re focused so much on reporting that we forget to really dig in and comb through the data. With SMX Report next Tuesday, this sentiment really hit home for me. I’ve seen some sneak peeks of the topics and session takeaways, and I can’t wait for attendees to see all the tactical analysis that our speakers are bringing to this virtual event. Sessions cover everything from competitive PPC analysis to what’s new in …

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What's Changed (and What Hasn't): The 2020 Moz Blog Reader Survey Results

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Posted by morgan.mcmurray You're tired of hearing it and I'm tired of saying it, but 2020 really has been a year like no other. SEOs and marketers around the world had to deal with their day-to-day work moving home, alongside a host of natural disasters, civil rights issues, and a pandemic that will alter our industry and global economy for years to come. We could have held off on launching this year's reader survey, but we decided to move forward anyway because we know your work and your interests have been impacted, and we wanted to know how much. I'm excited to share with you the results from that survey in this post. We'll go through what's changed — and what hasn't — for our readership since our last survey in 2017, and detail what those insights mean for the Moz Blog in 2021. Methodology We published this survey in …

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Heavy industry needs more diversity. Here’s why

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Data from McKinsey show that companies in the top quartile of gender and ethnic diversity were 25% and 36% more likely to financially outperform those in the bottom quartile, respectively. During times of economic turmoil, women and underrepresented groups—those whose gains are more recent in the workplace—experience a disproportionate negative economic impact. Unless we address this proactively, we are at risk of undoing decades’ worth of progress. Read Full Story

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Proximity Third: A Deeper Dive into a Local Ranking Factors Surprise

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Posted by MiriamEllis Image credit: J.B. Hill What’s the good of a survey if it doesn’t result in at least a few surprises? I know my own eyebrows leapt skyward when the data first came in from the Moz State of the Local SEO Industry 2020 Survey and I saw that, in a break with tradition, participants had placed user-to-business proximity at a lowly third place in terms of influencing Google local pack rankings. Just a year ago, our respondents had voted it #1. If you’re feeling startled, too, here’s our chance to take a more granular look at the data and see if we can offer some useful theories for proximity’s drop in perceived dominance. First, a quick definition of user-to-business proximity What do local SEOs mean when they speak of user-to-business proximity? Imagine an Internet searcher is standing in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, looking on their …

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Proximity Third: A Deeper Dive into a Local Ranking Factors Surprise

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Posted by MiriamEllis Image credit: J.B. Hill What’s the good of a survey if it doesn’t result in at least a few surprises? I know my own eyebrows leapt skyward when the data first came in from the Moz State of the Local SEO Industry 2020 Survey and I saw that, in a break with tradition, participants had placed user-to-business proximity at a lowly third place in terms of influencing Google local pack rankings. Just a year ago, our respondents had voted it #1. If you’re feeling startled, too, here’s our chance to take a more granular look at the data and see if we can offer some useful theories for proximity’s drop in perceived dominance. First, a quick definition of user-to-business proximity What do local SEOs mean when they speak of user-to-business proximity? Imagine an Internet searcher is standing in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, looking on their …

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The long and frustrating history of the gender wage gap

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It’s been a road fraught with sexism and discrimination, and some estimates suggest it will still take 40 years to close the pay gap between the average man and woman—and much longer if you factor in race. If you look at average national pay-disparity numbers, you can calculate that it will take American female workers until March 24 of this year to earn the same amount of money that men did performing the same work over the course of 2020. This is why activist group the National Committee on Pay Equity designated March 24 Equal Pay Day for 2021. According to research from PayScale, the “uncontrolled gender pay gap” (defined as the ratio of the median earnings of women to men without controlling for various factors such as race) has decreased just 7¢ since 2015; in 2020, women earned 81¢ for every $1 a man made. Read Full Story

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5 reasons diversity training are not successful as anticipated

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The track record for various forms of diversity training shows how difficult it is to change people’s deeper attitudes and behaviors. Since the police killing of George Floyd and Black Lives Matter protests, companies are looking for ways to combat racial bias and discrimination at work. The stats are jarring. In one 2009 study , hiring managers were 74% more likely to hire candidates with white-sounding names when their résumés were identical. Despite evidence that teams with more diversity perform better than more homogeneous teams, Black and Latino workers remain underrepresented in STEM. Read Full Story

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