Pandemic whack-a-mole begins as cases spike in China, Germany, and South Korea

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The loosening of lockdown restrictions is going exactly as public health experts said it would. After weeks of dire warnings from public health experts that reopening economies will cause spikes in COVID-19 cases and spur a high-stakes game of pandemic whack-a-mole , the reopening of economies is causing spikes in COVID-19 cases and spurring a high-stakes game of pandemic whack-a-mole in China, Germany, and South Korea. Read Full Story

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‘Right now I’m scared’: Fears of a fourth virus wave grow as states ease restrictions

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Across the country, governors and mayors are loosening safety restrictions, while a pandemic weary populace throws off its collective mask and behaves as if the crisis is over. It isn’t. The novel coronavirus that we know as COVID-19 reached the U.S. on both coasts when it entered the country in January of last year. The first recorded case was reported in Snohomish County in Washington state, where a man presented symptoms after returning from a visit to his family in Wuhan, China. Read Full Story

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COVID-19 chaos: Here’s how much United, Delta, and American Airlines are cutting back on service

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As the coronavirus pandemic rages on and countries enter lockdown mode, businesses that exist to move people from place to place are suffering. As the coronavirus pandemic rages on and more countries enter lockdown mode, businesses that exist to move people from place to place are suffering—citizens are being asked not to cross streets, let alone borders. The airline industry has been hit especially hard by an unprecedented drop in demand as governments issue increasingly stringent travel restrictions, including suspended international travel between the U.S. and 28 European countries, China, and Iran. Read Full Story

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Pfizer’s digital chief: Technology can speed the race to a COVID-19 vaccine

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Lidia Fonseca, Pfizer’s chief digital and technology officer, is keeping the drug company’s networks and computers running while scientists work to find a vaccine. On January 24, as the novel coronavirus started to spread in China, the government enacted travel restrictions throughout Hubei, the province where humans first contracted the disease. “I remember vividly on January 27 that our Chinese colleagues could not [get to] work, and we got the first request to help,” recalled Lidia Fonseca, chief digital and technology officer at Pfizer. Employees who had worked on desktops or left laptops in the office couldn’t access work materials, so Fonseca’s team set up virtual desktops so people could access the pharmaceutical company’s network and applications. Read Full Story

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