Can I get COVID twice? New Lancet study offers insight on reinfection rates

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Reinfection is rare, according to a new study, but more likely in older people. The good people of Denmark have once again provided their excellent, centralized healthcare data to save us all, this time allowing researchers to track the COVID-19 infection rates of 4 million Danes last year, to see how many were infected twice. The results were published in The Lancet last week. Read Full Story

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How many COVID-19 infections are undetected? Studying its mutations may hold the answer

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In some areas, more than 90% of cases may not be showing up in the data. As of the end of June, there were more than 10.4 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 worldwide. The real number, of course, is much higher, though unknown, because of limited tests and because of how many people who are infected never have symptoms and so never think to get a test. At the nonprofit Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, researchers are using changes in the virus genome to estimate the number of undetected infections—and found that in some areas, more than 90% of cases weren’t discovered. Read Full Story

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NYC records day of zero COVID-19 deaths, as infection rate spikes elsewhere

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The death toll finally reached zero in the epicenter of the outbreak, but data show that the number of cases is rising in many states. New York City, the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S., just reported that there were no deaths related to the virus for the first time since March 11. The daily death toll reached a high of 590 on April 7, according to data from the New York City Department of Health . Read Full Story

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Report: Fast growth companies are the true powerhouses of the U.S. economy

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A new study examines the economic multiplier effect of so-called “scale ups,” and the challenges these companies face. During the last economic downturn nearly a third of net new jobs were created by just 2% of companies—enterprises with $10 million to $1 billion in revenue, growing an annual rate of 20% or more, according to a new report by Wakefield Research. The study forecasts that this same cohort of companies will likely have an outsized impact on job creation during the current economic slump. These firms “reacted quickly to the COVID-19 outbreak with policies aimed at securing revenue, with most maintaining positive growth outlooks into 2021,” the study says. Read Full Story

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Bad news, Hollywood: 90% of survey respondents want COVID-19 vaccine before going back to movies

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A survey found that an overwhelming majority of people said a coronavirus vaccine was the key factor in deciding when they’d return to the cineplex. A recent study conducted by events analytics firm Performance Research—in partnership with Full Circle Research Co. and published by Variety —could mean bad news for Hollywood. Seventy percent of respondents said they prefer to watch new movies from home—a continuation of a worrisome trend for the film industry. Thirteen percent of those respondents said they would watch from a local cinema, and the last 17% were unsure. Read Full Story

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This is where the next pandemic is likely to emerge

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COVID-19 won’t be the last time a virus jumps from animals to humans and threatens humanity. Now scientists are trying to determine what factors are most likely to incubate the next deadly virus. Roughly a year ago, it’s likely that the new coronavirus made the jump from a wild animal to the first infected human in Wuhan, China, before spreading throughout the city, and then leaping quickly to the rest of the world. If 2020 seemed like an anomaly, it isn’t: Scientists say that another pandemic will follow at some point in the future. A new study tries to identify where it might emerge. Read Full Story

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Quitting smoking because of COVID-19? Nicotine replacement products may help spread cancer

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A new study from Wake Forest School of Medicine finds that nicotine promotes the spread of lung cancer cells into the brain. The coronavirus pandemic provides an excellent reason to quit smoking: Smokers have terrible COVID-19 outcomes . But think twice before you hop on nicotine gum or nicotine patches. A new study finds that nicotine promotes the spread of lung cancer cells into the brain . Read Full Story

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Is it safe to fly yet? Your chances of catching COVID-19 on an airplane might be lower than you realize

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A new study has found that the odds of becoming infected on a short-haul flight are relatively low—assuming everyone on the flight is wearing a mask, that is. Air travel has been one of the hardest-hit industries since the COVID-19 pandemic broke out in force earlier this year. Understandably, not many people feel safe riding in a sealed tube for hours on end with other passengers who can spread a respiratory disease via invisible airborne particles. Read Full Story

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