What Biden could do on climate—even with a Republican Senate

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The election hasn’t been called, but should Biden win but not control the Senate, he can still put us back in the Paris agreement—and push change via regulations and executive action. On November 4, Trump officially withdrew from the Paris climate agreement . If Biden wins, on his first day in office on January 20, he plans to rejoin it—a first step in setting the U.S. on a path to tackle climate change, which Biden has called the “number one issue facing humanity.” Read Full Story

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Biden pledged to cut emissions 50% this decade. Can it happen?

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Most analysts are overestimating how quickly things can transform in the near term, and probably underestimating how profound change will have to be into the more distant future. President Joe Biden announced an ambitious new national climate target at the world leaders’ climate summit on April 22. He pledged to cut U.S. carbon emissions in half by the end of this decade—a drop of 50%-52% by 2030 compared to 2005 levels—and aim for net-zero emissions by 2050. Read Full Story

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Big ideas for Biden’s first 100 days

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The new administration needs to move quickly on multiple fronts to confront a variety of crises. Our new series will look at how the new administration will move on key issues—from climate to AI to worker pay, and more—in the next few months. On January 2o, the clock started on the first 100 days of the Biden administration. While there will be 1,360 more days to follow, the period between January and the end of April is when the direction and forcefulness of the new president’s initial policies will be judged. How will he change regulation? What can he push through Congress? What first steps will his new appointees take? Read Full Story

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Biden plans to fight climate change in a way no U.S. president has before

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The former governor of Colorado explains how the government can institute a comprehensive and coordinated “all hands on deck” approach to the climate crisis. Joe Biden is preparing to deal with climate change in a way no U.S. president has done before – by mobilizing his entire administration to take on the challenge from every angle in a strategic, integrated way. Read Full Story

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How Biden’s new Civilian Climate Corps would work

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Biden wants to pay people to help fight climate change by putting them to work on conservation projects. In 1933, when millions of Americans were out of work because of the Great Depression, the newly created Civilian Conservation Corps—part of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal—hired a “tree army” of young men who eventually planted 3.5 billion trees (among other projects, such as building trails in national parks) across the country. Biden’s new Civilian Climate Corps has similar goals: Give people jobs and simultaneously tackle climate work such as reforestation and protecting biodiversity. Read Full Story

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What John Kerry has planned as Biden’s climate envoy

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At a conversation with Al Gore to mark the U.S. returning to the Paris Climate agreement, the former Secretary of State and new climate envoy discussed how the U.S. can regain the trust of the global climate community. It’s now been 30 days since President Biden signed an executive order to rejoin the Paris climate agreement, which means the U.S. is formally back in the global effort. But while there is important symbolism in that action, it’s only the beginning of the climate work Biden’s administration must do. John Kerry, who first signed the country into that agreement as Secretary of State in 2016, is now tasked with convincing the rest of the world that the U.S. can be trusted as a leader in this space as Biden’s climate envoy. Read Full Story

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The U.S. rejoined the Paris agreement. Now comes the hard part

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Four years of inaction mean the country is far behind on the commitments required by the climate agreement. Here’s the bold action the Biden administration will need to take to keep the U.S. on track. More than three and a half years after Trump said that the U.S. would pull out of the Paris climate agreement, we’re back in. On Biden’s first day in office, rejoining the accord was the third of 17 immediate executive orders he signed as soon as was sworn in. Rejoining was simple; after sending a letter to the United Nations, the U.S. will officially be part of Paris again in a month. The next part is harder. How can the world’s second-largest polluter shrink emissions enough to comply with the deal. Read Full Story

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The 2020 presidential election will decide the fate of the climate

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As we approach planetary tipping points, it’s vital to understand the two candidates’ plans—or lack thereof (Trump doesn’t have one)—for combatting climate change. Whether the world succeeds in avoiding the worst impacts of climate change is likely to hinge in part on the results of the upcoming U.S. election. Climate scientist Michael Mann has said that a second Trump term would be “game over” for the climate, making it virtually impossible to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. Biden, by contrast, is proposing the most ambitious climate policy of any major party nominee in U.S. history. Here’s a closer look at the differences. Read Full Story

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