Big ideas for Biden’s first 100 days

{ object.primary_image.title }}

The new administration needs to move quickly on multiple fronts to confront a variety of crises. Our new series will look at how the new administration will move on key issues—from climate to AI to worker pay, and more—in the next few months. On January 2o, the clock started on the first 100 days of the Biden administration. While there will be 1,360 more days to follow, the period between January and the end of April is when the direction and forcefulness of the new president’s initial policies will be judged. How will he change regulation? What can he push through Congress? What first steps will his new appointees take? Read Full Story

Read Full Article on Fast Company

7 climate actions that Biden could take on his first day

{ object.primary_image.title }}

From rejoining the Paris Agreement to stopping the Keystone Pipeline to restoring the Bears Ears monuments, some of the Trump administration’s most public environmental rollbacks can be easily reversed by a new president. The last four years have been devastating for environmental regulation. The Trump administration dismantled the Clean Power Plan, opened Arctic wilderness for drilling, and, as part of a spree of rollbacks in his last days in office, shrank the protected habitat of the northern spotted owl. Those are just the most visible of the more than 100 rollbacks of environmental rules spearheaded by the administration. Now the Biden administration will start trying to reinstate them. Some of the changes will take years to reverse—and going further will often require votes in the Senate that may not be winnable. But Biden can also begin to repair some of the damage on his first day in office. Read Full …

More

What young people want from the first 100 days of the Biden administration

{ object.primary_image.title }}

A coalition of youth advocacy organizations presents the new administration with a bold—but realistic—opening agenda. Millennials and Generation Z now make up the largest voting bloc in the U.S., currently an estimated 37% and growing, but they are underrepresented in government. Those young voters—who cast ballots in large numbers this year, largely for Joe Biden—expect concrete actions in return for their votes. To make that happen, a coalition of youth-led groups is now pushing for policies that will help the younger generations, especially as they navigate the effects of the coronavirus pandemic and what for many of them is the second recession of their lifetimes. Read Full Story

More

How to watch Joe Biden’s first address to Congress live on CNN, PBS, or elsewhere for free

{ object.primary_image.title }}

It’s not a State of the Union address, but it’s the first time President Biden will deliver a joint address to Congress. Here’s where you can stream it. President Joe Biden will deliver his first address to a joint session of Congress on Wednesday evening, touting his legislative achievements and outlining his administration’s near-term goals as his presidency concludes its first 100 days. Biden is expected to discuss details of his $1.8 trillion American Families Plan . He’ll be flanked by Vice President Kamala Harris on one side and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on the other. According to The New York Times , only about 200 people will be in attendance due to the COVID-19 pandemic; much of Congress will be watching virtually. After the speech, Republican senator Tim Scott of South Carolina will deliver a response. Read Full Story

More

How can Biden beat COVID-19? We asked Obama’s healthcare guru

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Joe Biden has won the presidency, but if Democrats don’t control the Senate, does he have any shot at designing an effective COVID-19 response? Andy Slavitt explains what Biden can–and can’t–do. When Joe Biden is sworn in as president on January 20th, 2021, the U.S. could be approaching 500,000 lives lost to COVID-19. As the rest of the world has already proven, these deaths were not inevitable, but the result of the science-denying Trump administration and GOP, which failed to control the pandemic. Read Full Story

More

What Biden could do on climate—even with a Republican Senate

{ object.primary_image.title }}

The election hasn’t been called, but should Biden win but not control the Senate, he can still put us back in the Paris agreement—and push change via regulations and executive action. On November 4, Trump officially withdrew from the Paris climate agreement . If Biden wins, on his first day in office on January 20, he plans to rejoin it—a first step in setting the U.S. on a path to tackle climate change, which Biden has called the “number one issue facing humanity.” Read Full Story

More

What can Biden do to quickly stimulate the sputtering U.S. economy?

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Put simply, the Biden administration faces a troubled economy the likes of which hasn’t been seen in U.S. history. He will need to find a way to quickly bring relief. President-elect Joe Biden has said fixing the economy will be one of his administration’s top priorities when he takes office in January. R. Andrew Butters, assistant professor of business economics and public policy at Indiana University and a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, explains the challenges Biden will face and what kind of stimulus the U.S. will need. Read Full Story

More

Biden-Sanders task force proposals could actually move the needle on climate action

{ object.primary_image.title }}

The Biden-Sanders task force recently released its policy recommendations for Joe Biden. Its ambitious climate goals would get the U.S. to 100% clean energy sooner than Biden’s current plan, and create hundreds of thousands of good paying, possibly union jobs. Under a Biden administration, the U.S. may set out to reach 100% clean energy by 2035, and net-zero carbon emissions in new buildings by 2030. Read Full Story

More

What environmental rule rollbacks will Trump try to sneak through before the end?

{ object.primary_image.title }}

After four years of allowing more pollution and emissions, the Trump administration has 10 weeks left to accomplish its deregulatory agenda. The Midnight Watch Project is keeping a list, so it can all be fixed after. President-elect Joseph Biden has big plans for climate policy, from rejoining the Paris climate agreement to decarbonizing the electric grid , but these initiatives won’t begin until his inauguration on January 20, 2021. In the meantime, the Trump administration still has 10 weeks (and counting) in office. In the past four years, the administration has already rolled back hundreds of rules designed to do everything from preventing the release of methane from oil wells to limiting how much mercury a coal power plant can emit. In the lame duck period, it could accelerate plans to do more before inauguration day. Read Full Story

More

The U.S. rejoined the Paris agreement. Now comes the hard part

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Four years of inaction mean the country is far behind on the commitments required by the climate agreement. Here’s the bold action the Biden administration will need to take to keep the U.S. on track. More than three and a half years after Trump said that the U.S. would pull out of the Paris climate agreement, we’re back in. On Biden’s first day in office, rejoining the accord was the third of 17 immediate executive orders he signed as soon as was sworn in. Rejoining was simple; after sending a letter to the United Nations, the U.S. will officially be part of Paris again in a month. The next part is harder. How can the world’s second-largest polluter shrink emissions enough to comply with the deal. Read Full Story

More

What John Kerry has planned as Biden’s climate envoy

{ object.primary_image.title }}

At a conversation with Al Gore to mark the U.S. returning to the Paris Climate agreement, the former Secretary of State and new climate envoy discussed how the U.S. can regain the trust of the global climate community. It’s now been 30 days since President Biden signed an executive order to rejoin the Paris climate agreement, which means the U.S. is formally back in the global effort. But while there is important symbolism in that action, it’s only the beginning of the climate work Biden’s administration must do. John Kerry, who first signed the country into that agreement as Secretary of State in 2016, is now tasked with convincing the rest of the world that the U.S. can be trusted as a leader in this space as Biden’s climate envoy. Read Full Story

More

Subscribe to our newsletter

Join our newsletter and never miss out trending marketing news.

HitcountVariables(pk=15646, ajax_url='/api/hit/ajax/', hits='6')