As office buildings empty out, here’s one creative use for all of that space

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Office buildings can be turned into schools pretty easily, as one project in the Bay Area shows. Offices around the U.S. are sitting empty, as the pandemic has forced many employees to work from home. Some of these offices will eventually come back to life, but others may lay fallow indefinitely. But, as one project in California shows, they don’t have to fall completely out of use. A formerly vacant office building there has been converted into a new school. Read Full Story

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The bad toilet paper from your office might be the sustainable answer to TP shortages

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Using more toilet paper at home is destroying forests. Instead of churning out more of the TP we usually use at home, can producers find a way to get consumers the stuff they’ve already made for empty offices? Weeks into the coronavirus pandemic, many toilet paper shelves are still empty, and suppliers aren’t sure when rolls will be available again. But as Americans need bathroom tissue for at-home use, there’s a supply chain going unused: the kind of toilet paper stocked by offices, schools, sports arenas, and other public places that now are empty. This toilet paper is often more sustainably made than the TP you buy yourself, so getting it to consumers would be an environmentally friendly way to fill that toilet-tissue need. Read Full Story

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A Marketer’s Guide to Working Remotely

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Remote work is going from an occasional perk to the norm. As long as you have a computer and internet connection, you can perform your job anytime, anywhere. For marketers, creating promotional materials, meeting clients, and completing projects from home, hotel, coffee shop, library—basically anywhere with an internet connection. While working remotely has many benefits, employees who regularly worked in the office may have a difficult time making the transition to exclusively working this way. In this article, we’ll talk about the how’s and why’s of remote work for marketers. The Rise in Popularity of Working Remotely Remote work has been around for years. However, the COVID-19 pandemic made it unexpectedly the norm for many businesses, and both employers and employees are realizing the work-from-home system can be successful. According to Global Workplace Analytics , big companies like Best Buy, British Telecom, Dow Chemical found remote workers are 35 percent …

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Coronavirus is making buildings sick, too

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COVID-19 stay-at-home orders may increase the chance that people are exposed to dangerous water when they return to work, school, and stores. While millions of people are under orders to stay home amid the coronavirus pandemic, water is sitting in the pipes of empty office buildings and gyms, getting old and potentially dangerous. Read Full Story

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‘Mentorship made my career’: How to pay it forward to young talent while remote

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Without the option of a casual desk drop-by, nurturing early-career talent takes creativity. Here are a few strategies to inspire you. One of my first mentors in real estate was a partner in a small consulting firm, where I worked as a project manager out of graduate school. She was a smart and charismatic professional with a passion for built environments. Reflecting on the experience, it wasn’t the formal work that taught me the most, but the downtime conversation and time observing her in action. For instance, before a meeting she’d show me how to craft the agenda to drive the conversation intentionally. Later, we would go through what worked and didn’t work. And over casual coffees, she’d tell me how important it was for female developers to construct these buildings, standing as evidence of their immutable accomplishments. Read Full Story

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Empty office buildings are still devouring energy. Why?

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Why are empty office buildings still air-conditioned all day long? Blame pre-pandemic leases. In May, when the pandemic was solidly in what would be its first peak in cities around the United States, office electricity consumption dropped by nearly 25%—a predictable dip as many companies closed their doors and turned off the lights. Energy-sucking office equipment and lighting systems were switched either off or to standby mode as workers left the buildings, and office electricity use came down to record lows. That’s according to Hatch Data , which tracks and analyzes building data from utility meters and equipment in more than 550 million square feet of occupied space in about 2,700 commercial properties across North America. Read Full Story

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New York Gov. Cuomo: Empty offices should become housing

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“We should do it now.” Like many cities around the world, New York City has seen life drained from its commercial core, as offices have been left to sit nearly empty for months. These unoccupied offices raise a lot of questions about the future of work, the future of cities, and whether buildings built to hold offices will even make sense in a world so thoroughly upended by a pandemic. But they may also be offering some solutions. Read Full Story

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