The real legacy of the work-from-home era? Robotic furniture

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Ori makes motorized furniture that can dramatically transform small spaces. There has long been a trade-off associated with dense urban areas. In exchange for the action and vitality of city living, people often compromise on space. If you’re spending most of your time working and enjoying the city, the shoebox apartment isn’t a major problem. But now, when most people are working in that same shoebox and practically forbidden from enjoying the city outside, the compromise on square footage feels more like a punishment. Read Full Story

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Mark Zuckerberg’s new work-from-home zeal is very, very convenient

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The CEO’s assertion that half of Facebook’s workforce will work remotely by 2030 runs counter to its company culture and physical offices, which are designed to encourage people to live at work. I’ve been to Facebook’s Menlo Park campus a number of times, and it’s easy to understand why employees don’t often leave. Inside the massive complex , you get the same feeling as when you’re inside some huge Las Vegas casinos—that there’s just no reason to go outside. Read Full Story

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Dyson’s new 3-in-1 fan cleans the air in your home. Is it worth $800?

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It’s a fan, purifier, and humidifier in one—all with Dyson’s signature engineering and design ingenuity. Thanks to shelter in place orders, many of us are spending more time at home than ever—and that’s saying something, because Americans typically spend 90% of our time indoors. It can be difficult to get the air quality in your home consistently comfortable. (I, for one, relied on an ad hoc team of humidifier, fan, and a slightly open window to combat my old-school radiator and get the humidity and temperature in my apartment to their optimal levels this past winter.) All of that time indoors also means more exposure to airborne pollutants, some of which are two to five times more concentrated inside than outside, according to the Environmental Protection Agency . Read Full Story

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A hidden source of emissions while we’ve been stuck inside: your home cooking

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Especially if you have a gas stove, spending more time at home for a year may have been bad for your lungs. When Alex Huffman, an aerosol scientist and associate professor at the University of Denver, recently outfitted his house with CO2 monitors—part of a home experiment to see how well different spaces were ventilated—he found out his home was pretty tightly sealed against the outside air, but carbon dioxide exhaled from his family would build up a bit as they lived their lives. There was a bigger surprise, though: When they cooked, the CO2 levels skyrocketed—not only in the kitchen, but throughout the house. Read Full Story

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This village for the homeless just got a new addition: 3D-printed houses

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Icon is printing full houses to give Austin’s homeless a real home to live in. For the last few years, Tim Shea has lived in an RV in a small community outside Austin that was designed for people who were once chronically homeless. In early May, he’ll move from the RV into one of the community’s first 3D-printed homes—a small house with walls made from a concrete-like material that were automatically extruded from a giant, 33-foot-long machine. Read Full Story

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The best slippers, slides, and shoes for lounging around the house

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The comfiest, coziest, most practical footwear for inside your house—and maybe occasionally outside too. We’re more than a month into the new norm of working from our kitchen tables and couches, trading button-downs for what basically count as daytime pajamas , and living in joggers and leggings . And there is one essential piece of quarantine uniform that is crucial for keeping feet warm and comfy whether you’re on the couch or taking a spin around the block: house shoes. House shoes are more than your average slipper. They’re comfy but never sloppy. And despite their name, house shoes can handle a quick trip to the backyard or a walk around the block. If you aren’t wearing house shoes yet—or you aren’t totally in love with the pair you have on right now (assuming—probably correctly—that you are at home)—we’ve got some suggestions for you. Read Full Story

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