American suburbs are about to look more like European cities

{ object.primary_image.title }}

COVID-19 may accelerate a pattern that turns dull, transit-oriented developments into neighborhoods that resemble bustling cities. But there are risks. Over the past few decades, transit-oriented developments have risen in inner-ring suburbs across North America, adding homes and shops near the transit lines that shuttle workers in and out of core cities. It’s an old style of development, one more familiar in dense, transit-rich European countries, but one that caught a renewed interest in the 1990s. In places like Pasadena, California , and Aurora, Illinois , TOD projects leveraged transit access to create a more multifaceted sense of urbanity in places where it might not have emerged on its own. Read Full Story

Read Full Article on Fast Company

If Joe Biden wants to fix the housing crisis, he should start in New York’s suburbs

{ object.primary_image.title }}

The suburbs have failed to build their fair share of housing in the U.S. But with enough pressure from the top, that may change. President-elect Joe Biden has a plan for fixing the housing crisis , squarely targeting the shortages, costs, and discrimination that have made it difficult for many people to find a place to live. If he’s looking for a good place to begin this work once in office, he should look no further than the suburbs of the country’s most populous city. According to a new report , overly restrictive land use regulations in New York City’s suburbs have made housing there more expensive, limited, and segregated than almost anywhere else in the country. Read Full Story

More

Can Biden save public transit from the pandemic?

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Ridership—and revenue—are cratering. Will there be anything left once we’re vaccinated? The Biden administration and new Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg will have to act fast to give federal help so states and cities can turn things around. Even before the pandemic, mass transit in the U.S. had been struggling: 2018 marked the fourth straight year of ridership decline across the country, and though 2019 offered some hope with two full quarters of ridership growth, the pandemic crushed that progress. For public transit systems, fewer riders means less revenue, compounding longstanding funding issues. But with the Biden administration now in place, transit experts see hope for their industry’s future—one that is inextricably tied to climate goals and social equity—as long as the administration can get them the funding and federal policies they need. Read Full Story

More

The secret to revitalizing urban downtowns

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Most pedestrian malls failed, but the survivors have lessons to teach. In the postwar blur of suburban sprawl, interstate highways, white flight, and social uprisings, American cities saw their downtowns drained of life in the 1960s. One of the more common attempts to revive them was the development of pedestrian malls. Closed to vehicular traffic and inspired by successful pedestrianized areas in Europe, these shopping streets turned otherwise normal downtown thoroughfares into strolling spaces lined with ground floor retail, seating, planters, and pedestrian amenities. They were seen as a way to revitalize downtowns in the ’60s and ’70s, and re-create the kinds of lively, interesting public spaces that once made up the heart of cities. Enclosed suburban shopping malls were growing in popularity across the country, particularly in the suburbs. If it worked inside, the thinking went, maybe it could work outside, too. Read Full Story

More

The future of cities is walkable, healthy, resilient places

{ object.primary_image.title }}

COVID-19 will reshape the city, but the bounce back could make them more livable. Cities throughout time have faced challenges, vast changes, and civil strife, but our future—much like our past—will be urban. The nature of humanity and progress is that we need to be around one another to think collaboratively, create what is next, and collectively drive toward the future. Read Full Story

More

Rich countries are hoarding COVID-19 vaccines

{ object.primary_image.title }}

The U.S., U.K, and E.U. now have more vaccines ordered than they need. Will they help distribute them to the rest of the world? As vaccine manufacturing picks up speed, the U.S. could end up with an extra 450 million doses more than needed to vaccinate every American—at the same time that some developing countries still have few doses or none at all. The U.K. and Canada could have another 200 million extra doses. Hundreds of millions more will likely be available in the European Union. Read Full Story

More

How to get more confident speaking up in meetings

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Sharing your opinions in meetings can be stressful, especially if you’re more introverted. These steps can make it easier to succeed. Group meetings can be intimidating. Lots of people, often at different levels of the organization, are sitting in one place throwing out ideas. Meetings are an opportunity to have an impact on ideas in development, but they are also a place where you can display your ignorance in front of a large group. If you’re new in an organization or an introvert who doesn’t like that spotlight, it can be easier to fade into the background and look to have your impact elsewhere. Read Full Story

More

This innovative tax plan is designed to help cities pay for climate action

{ object.primary_image.title }}

In Berkeley, California, an increase in the utility tax on wealthy households that use a lot of power would go toward subsidizing lower-income residents in transitioning to clean alternatives. Berkeley, California, is one of hundreds of cities to have declared a climate emergency. More than a decade ago, it also adopted a climate action plan. But the city hasn’t had the funding it needs to actually tackle the problem. Read Full Story

More

Cities are starting to ban evictions to help workers affected by the coronavirus response

{ object.primary_image.title }}

“This is a public health crisis, and we need to make sure that it doesn’t create a whole new housing crisis in the upcoming weeks.” Someone trying to survive in the Bay Area with a minimum-wage job probably can’t pay rent if they miss one paycheck. But as people increasingly avoid public places because of the new coronavirus, workers (especially those who work for tips) are losing money quickly. And if anyone becomes sick, they’ll be forced to miss work for 14 days of quarantine. If schools close, parents will also miss work. The entire environment is making it more likely that some people may not have enough money to pay essential bills. So in San Jose, the city council voted today to begin work on a plan to temporarily ban evictions due to the epidemic. Read Full Story

More

If COVID-19 pushes people to the suburbs, how can we make them more environmentally friendly?

{ object.primary_image.title }}

As people move out of dense cities and into sprawling suburbs, their carbon footprint could actually increase. Four miles from downtown Austin is a suburb that doesn’t much resemble the 1950s archetype of big family houses behind white-picket fences, wide streets, and endless sprawl. Instead, Mueller, Texas , is a modern, mixed-use, equitable, eco-conscious community, built on the lot of an old decommissioned airport, comprised of a mix of solar-ready single homes and apartment blocks, shops, restaurants, offices, a 30-acre park and jogging trails, a museum and an open-air amphitheater, and the highest number of electric cars per capita in the country. It’s described as “an alternative to land-consumptive and automobile-dependent development patterns throughout the region.” Read Full Story

More

Post-pandemic public transit may not end up looking all that different—but its goals may have to change

{ object.primary_image.title }}

Concept designs with plexiglass shields probably aren’t coming to transit. Instead, cities have to figure out how to make the systems safe and useful for the people who don’t have a choice but to use them. As cities start to reopen, packed rush-hour subway rides seem like they’ll have to become a thing of the past: It’s hard to social distance on a packed train. But transit will still be crucial for helping people—especially lower-income residents—get around, and experts say straphangers will be back even before COVID-19 has been controlled. So what does that mean for the trains of our future? Read Full Story

More

Subscribe to our newsletter

Join our newsletter and never miss out trending marketing news.

HitcountVariables(pk=11619, ajax_url='/api/hit/ajax/', hits='5')