All Apple products will be carbon neutral by 2030

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The company is ramping up efforts to reduce emissions through its supply chain and pushing to have more of its products recycled. Within a decade, every product that Apple makes will be carbon neutral. The company, which is already carbon neutral in its corporate operations, now plans to reach the same goal across its entire footprint, including its supply chain and the full life cycle of its products, which it says will have “zero climate impact.” Read Full Story

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How Sweetgreen plans to cut its carbon footprint in half in the next 6 years

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To get its emissions down, the salad chain had to do exhausting research on every supplier—and create new salads with ingredients that sequester more carbon. With a menu focused on plants, the salad chain Sweetgreen automatically has a lower carbon footprint than a typical fast-food chain serving millions of burgers. But the company now plans to go a step further, setting the goal of cutting its carbon footprint in half in the next six years. The rest of its emissions will be offset, making the company carbon neutral. Read Full Story

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Shining a light on companies that have achieved carbon-neutrality

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The nonprofit Climate Neutral is one of our World Changing Ideas honorees for 2020. A new label will soon start appearing on products you see in stores: “Climate Neutral Certified.” Climate Neutral, a nonprofit launched in 2019, helps brands measure their carbon footprints, offset them by investing in vetted pollution-capturing projects, and make long-term plans to reduce emissions. Once a company goes through the process, it can print the label on its packaging—a symbol the nonprofit hopes will become as ubiquitous as the USDA organic label. Because calculating a corporate carbon footprint can be a pricey, complex process for brands, Climate Neutral also created a new digital tool to make it simpler. “We wanted to democratize the process of carbon counting and demystify it,” says CEO Austin Whitman. “For many companies, just starting to understand where their carbon emissions come from is a huge step forward.” The group recruited more …

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How Starbucks plans to make its coffee carbon neutral

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From smarter farming to new varieties, the coffee giant is working on a variety of strategies to end emissions on the farms that produce its beans. If you buy an espresso at Starbucks—brewed in a machine running on renewable electricity—most of the carbon footprint of the drink comes from how the coffee was grown. But by the end of the decade, the company plans to reach its goal of making even the production of its raw coffee beans carbon neutral. Read Full Story

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PepsiCo is scaling up regenerative agriculture on 7 million acres of land

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The push will bring new techniques to sequester carbon to nearly all of the company’s agricultural footprint. In a year, PepsiCo buys around 4 billion pounds of potatoes to make potato chips. It’s one piece of the massive web of farms that supply the company, which the company wants to use to help make an equally massive change: By the end of the decade, it now plans to work with the tens of thousands of farmers in its supply chain to spread regenerative agriculture—practices that can help improve sustainability—across 7 million acres, or roughly its entire agricultural footprint. It estimates that the changes will eliminate at least 3 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions. Read Full Story

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PepsiCo says it will reach net-zero emissions by 2040

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In two decades, the giant food and beverage company plans a major shift to renewables and changes throughout its supply chain. As one of the largest food and beverage companies in the world, PepsiCo has a correspondingly massive carbon footprint—it generated 57 million metric tons in 2019. But by 2040, 10 years ahead of what’s necessary to meet the goals of the Paris climate agreement, it plans to reach net-zero emissions. Read Full Story

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Apple stock is splitting: Here’s what that means and what you need to know

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In late August, owners of AAPL will have four times the amount of shares they previously owned. But the total value of those shares won’t be four times higher. Here’s why. Apple had an astonishingly good earnings call yesterday. Scratch that: It’s was absolutely phenomenal. Despite the pandemic and the severe economic consequences it has had, despite Apple closing virtually all of its retail stores at some point during the last quarter, and despite disrupted supply chains around the world, Apple posted record third-quarter results . Read Full Story

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H&M joins the ‘open innovation’ craze with a plan to share its production chain with rivals

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H&M, a company criticized for fast fashion, wants to bring sustainable supply chains to competitors. This season, while H&M is hawking the ubiquitous dress-and-sneakers look ( why ?), it is also debuting Treadler, a new supply-chain sharing service that will allow smaller brands to utilize its infrastructure from development to delivery, reports the Financial Times. Read Full Story

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Still looking for Clorox wipes? Here’s how the company has innovated to meet unprecedented demand

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Andy Mowery, chief product supply officer of the Clorox Company, reveals how COVID-19 may have changed the rules of manufacturing and supply chain forever. For Fast Company’ s Shape of Tomorrow series , we’re asking business leaders to share their inside perspective on how the COVID-19 era is transforming their industries. Here’s what’s been lost—and what could be gained—in the new world order . Read Full Story

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Electric car company Polestar is designing a car that can be manufactured with zero emissions

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Polestar’s climate-neutral car won’t use any offsets. Instead, the EV company is pioneering car production processes that are truly zero carbon. When companies make a “carbon-neutral” product, it usually involves buying carbon offsets that support projects like reforestation in distant forests . Forests need the help—but it doesn’t eliminate the fact that making the product itself is still a source of pollution. Polestar, a Swedish electric car company owned by Volvo, is taking a different approach: The newest car it’s designing aims to completely eliminate emissions in manufacturing without the use of offsets. “Offsetting is a cop-out,” Thomas Ingenlath, Polestar CEO, said in a statement. Read Full Story

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