4 daily practices that foster emotional resilience

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Psychologists have been studying resilience for decades. Here’s what they’ve found. If you want to learn a thing or two about emotional resilience, just talk to entrepreneur Ash Ambirge , creator of the Middle Finger Project. She’s been looked down on because she grew up in a trailer park. She’s been fired from jobs she worked hard to land. She’s had her heart broken and her savings stolen on the same day. She’s spent more than a few nights sleeping in her car. Yet even after all that, she’s still standing. Read Full Story

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RIP, Naya Rivera: Tributes to the ‘Glee’ actress celebrate her life and contribution to LGBTQ characters

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She leaves behind a son, whose life she saved before dying. Jane Lynch, Chris Colfer, and Darren Criss are among those mourning her death. Five days after being reported missing, Naya Rivera was officially confirmed dead yesterday. Ventura County authorities found her body in Lake Piru, where she had been boating with her four-year-old son, who survives her. Reports indicate that she saved her son from drowning but was not able to save herself. The discovery of her remains came on the seventh anniversary of her former Glee co-star Cory Monteith’s death. Read Full Story

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See Jane Goodall’s new kids’ decor line with Crate & Barrel

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Jane Goodall launches a collection with Crate & Barrel to get kids thinking about the environment as early as possible. Here, she talks to us about the collection, why capitalism is broken, and how children can help save the planet. When I talk to Dr. Jane Goodall, she’s sitting in her childhood home in Bournemouth, on the south coast of England, where four generations of her family have lived. The 86-year-old primatologist is wearing a Patagonia jacket and sitting in front of a bookshelf displaying black-and-white pictures of her mother. Read Full Story

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Five things we learned about Michelle Obama from her Netflix documentary ‘Becoming’

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One of them is that if you’re holding out hope for her to save 2020, it’s not going to happen. “Your life isn’t yours anymore,” says Michelle Obama at the outset of Becoming , the new documentary based on her 2018 memoir of the same name. She makes the poignantly self-aware comment as she examines what her life will be like after spending the past eight years under the scrutiny that comes with life as the First Lady of the United States. Read Full Story

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The internet decimated creative industries. It’s coming for architecture, too

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So suggests Sweeten Founder Jean Brownhill, who thinks architects can save their industry by building their own platforms. Jean Brownhill is an architect and the founder and CEO of Sweeten , a service that matches people with major renovation projects to general contractors. She developed Sweeten while attending Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design as a Loeb Fellow in 2011 and is one of just 11 African-American female entrepreneurs in the United States to raise more than $1 million in venture capital. Here, she shares what she learned working as an architect at Coach, why architects should build digital platforms, and why creatives should “optimize for their obituary.” Read Full Story

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‘I feel devastated’: COVID-19 long-haulers fight for understanding from employers

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Those who have been struggling for months to recover from the disease face more than just medical uncertainty. Many are dealing with job loss or lack of accommodations from employers who don’t understand their prognosis. As New Jersey entered lockdown in March, Alexa was sent home from her job at a dental office. Like so many others, she rarely ventured out of the house in the following weeks, save for two grocery trips. “I was very nervous about it,” she says of the coronavirus. “Probably even a little more so because I work in the medical field.” Under normal circumstances, Alexa sang in a band by night, and while quarantined, she started sharing Facebook livestreams of herself singing. One evening, her mom mentioned she looked exhausted while singing and like she was having a hard time catching her breath. The next day, Alexa started showing symptoms of COVID-19. Read Full …

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How this Queens community built $1,000 college savings accounts for all its kids

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It’s part of a new program to build wealth for low-income kids across New York City—with a little help from their communities. In 1949, when she was 14 years old, Claudia Coger dropped out of high school. Despite being an A+ student and having skipped two grades, she knew that college was out of reach—she was the second of 10 kids, growing up in Sumter County, Florida, and there was no indication, she says, that scholarships would be available to her. It’s a reality for too many kids: Students from low-income families are 2.4 times more likely to drop out of high school than those from middle-income families, and 10 times more likely than students from high-income families, which affects how much they can earn out of school and contributes to the racial wealth gap. Read Full Story

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Female-founded companies will save our economy. Here’s why

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The founder of Pipeline Equity says it’s time for women to finally have the freedom to live the American dream by launching their companies with the requisite funding. The first wave of COVID-19 closures in March came just two months after I had moved my mum in to live with me and my family. She had been diagnosed with terminal cancer in December. Upon hearing the heartbreaking news, I decided to move her from California to Colorado, where she would spend her final months under my care and under my roof. This meant I had officially joined the ranks of the sandwich generation . Read Full Story

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Iris van Herpen has always been fascinated with the natural world. Now she wants to save it

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The haute couture designer, whose gowns have been worn by Lady Gaga and Beyoncé, turns her hand to fabric made of plastic fished from the ocean. For a recent collection, designer Iris van Herpen sent models down the runway in gowns that rippled with each step they took, reminiscent of waves undulating at the turning of the tide. This connection to water was deliberate: The dresses were made from plastic fished out of the ocean by the environmentalist organization Parley for the Oceans , and turned into fabric. Read Full Story

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