‘Dirty Money’ is back on Netflix—and it’s investigating the FDA, the EPA, and Jared Kushner

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The second season of the docuseries about business gone bad broadly covers capitalism run amok, and examines the boundaries companies are willing to cross in the name of turning a profit. In 2006, at the age of 25, Jared Kushner purchased the storied weekly newspaper The New York Observer (now a digital-only publication known as Observer ). Over the next few years, he used the media property to elevate his social standing in New York’s elite circles. At the same time, he oversaw his family firm’s disastrous acquisition of the (incredibly named) 666 Fifth Avenue for a record price of $1.8 billion in 2007 at the height of the pre-recession real-estate bubble. As his father-in-law, Donald J. Trump, ascended to the highest office in the country in January 2017, Kushner used his newly gained status as a senior advisor to the president (in charge of seemingly everything from tech policy to brokering a peace deal in the Middle East) and influence to try and solve his family’s business troubles. Read Full Story

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How Wikipedia’s volunteers became the web’s best weapon against misinformation

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In the Facebook era, the volunteer editors behind the archaic-looking website have built Wikipedia into a formidable force for truth. For a few minutes near the end of his first presidential debate, Mike Bloomberg was dead. At 9:38 p.m. Eastern time, a Wikipedia user named DQUACK02 added some text to the Wikipedia page for the former Democratic presidential candidate and New York City mayor: Read Full Story

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NYC’s latest architectural thriller lets you walk on glass, 1,100 feet in the air

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Hudson Yards is in the news again, thanks to a new sky-high addition. On March 11, a new, infinitely Instagrammable attraction will open its doors to New York residents and tourists. Edge at Hudson Yards is an observation deck that cantilevers 80 feet out from the 100th floor of the Manhattan development’s main retail tower (30 Hudson Yards) and hovers 1,131 feet above the city streets below. According to its architects, Edge is the highest outdoor observation deck in the western hemisphere, and the fifth highest one in the world. Read Full Story

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Netflix’s Jeffrey Epstein docuseries lets his victims tell their stories

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‘Filthy Rich: Jeffrey Epstein’ offers compelling testimony from a number of women he abused, giving viewers a sense of the scale of his crimes. The Jeffrey Epstein case is so compelling because it offers observers (and obsessives) so much to explore: celebrity (Epstein’s associations with a litany of public figures, including Prince Andrew and Bill Clinton ); money (the source of Epstein’s billions remains unknown, but he was L brands billionaire Les Wexner’s longtime money manager); and the salacious nature of his crimes. Read Full Story

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Microsoft’s CTO wants to spread tech’s wealth beyond the coasts

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In a new book, Kevin Scott argues that AI can help rural areas thrive—both by boosting existing businesses such as farming, and allowing new businesses to emerge. Microsoft CTO Kevin Scott and I share a few things in common. We both grew up in small American towns in the 70s and 80s, he in Virginia, me in Nebraska. We both now live and work in the Bay Area. We both make fairly frequent trips back to rural America to see family and friends. Read Full Story

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Working from home? Here’s how to separate the ‘work’ from the ‘home’

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Full-time remote work is the new normal—at least for now. Establishing boundaries—with the help of your partner, family, or roommates—can help you adjust. The realization that tens of millions of people who had never or rarely telecommuted would suddenly be asked or told to work from home led author Glenn Fleishman to write Take Control of Working from Home Temporarily , a 55-page book that he and his publisher, Take Control Books, are giving away. You can download a free copy from the publisher’s site . Here’s an excerpt. Read Full Story

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‘The New York Times’ stunned readers with its coronavirus front page. What if it did the same for Black deaths?

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“We want people to see the names of those murdered and the police departments associated with them and think, George Floyd isn’t the only murder to be angry about.” “ U.S. D eaths Near 100,000, An Incalculable Loss “: That was the front page headline of the New York Times on May 24. Underneath were the names of Americans who had lost their lives to COVID-19. They covered the entire front page. Read Full Story

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The untold origins of Apple’s groundbreaking design

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It all goes back to a food processor. Steve Jobs had started out more as a geek who liked mechanics than as a design aficionado. He was the sort of pale, indoors boy who spends hours tinkering with his ham radio when most guys his age are playing outside. Apple I was born in the Jobs family’s garage; Steve stored parts throughout the house. The device he put together consisted of a computer board, a keyboard, and a power supply. There was neither a monitor nor a case. One of many new information devices being developed at the time, it sold, but only to people who were already experts in that sort of gadgetry. The purchasers were knowledgeable hobbyists who understood how to make it run. Read Full Story

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