5 ways to ask your boss for more flexibility at work

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Flexibility can take many forms, but what is unambigous is the engagement and fulfillment employees feel from expanded options. Despite the many challenges of the pandemic, there are still plenty reasons to be optimistic about work after the pandemic. Before the dramatic changes of the coronavirus, many businesses insisted working at an office workstation every day was the only way to ensure accountability and performance. But lockdowns and the necessity for work-from-home strategies have forced companies to rethink and reconsider how work happens and how much flexibility they can afford employees. Read Full Story

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How the pandemic paved the way for more flexible benefits in 2021

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Every worker is juggling different responsibilities in the wake of the pandemic, creating a whole different perspective on benefits offerings. March 2020 will forever be a turning point for U.S. workers. That’s when many states issued stay-at-home orders that shuttered stores and restaurants and sent office denizens scrambling to make space in their home for remote work. For about half of the 3,500 employees of Paylocity, the transition was somewhat easier, as they’d already been working from home pre-pandemic. Read Full Story

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Surprising COVID-19 side effect: More companies adopt the 4-day workweek

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The author of ‘Shorter’ shows how any company that can go remote can make a 4-day week work. And those that have, illustrate why companies should look seriously at adopting a 4-day week. Many businesses that moved to remote work in response to the COVID-19 pandemic were surprised to find in the first month that the shift was less painful than expected. Companies have long treated work outside the office—whether remote, with flexible hours, or occasional work from home—with suspicion. Nothing could replace the creative ideas sparked by random encounters, or better demonstrate an employee’s loyalty and passion, than showing up and staying late. Read Full Story

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These are the skills you need to be successful in a hybrid environment

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Working for a company where some employees are remote and others are in the office requires new habits and systems. As organizations start to design post-pandemic workplaces, many are offering flexible remote working arrangements. This is creating to a hybrid environment, with some employees in the office and others working from home. A distributed workforce is bound to impact day-to-day operations, and leaders and their teams may need new habits and systems. Read Full Story

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How leaders can use emotional intelligence to connect with all employee types

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Figuring out how to effectively manage employees with different personalities and working styles is a critical part of emotionally intelligent leadership. Organizations have spent a lot of time, effort, and resources in recent years to find ways to motivate employees. From office perks , to personality tests designed to determine working styles and preferences—many employers devote a lot of effort to try to increase worker performance. Read Full Story

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Companies are rushing to reopen their offices. Here’s what they’re getting wrong

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Flexible work is here to stay. Where we get our work done is less important than how we get our work done. The coronavirus pandemic forced many of us to work from home, and the big surprise is: Work got done. Employees are still productive. They like the freedom of remote work. Yet some organizations are scrambling to reopen their offices as quickly as possible, and to do so, they are trotting out design solutions that supposedly protect workers, from algorithms for re-densifying offices to clinical “scrub” rooms in reception areas to the sorts of cubicles made infamous by Dilbert and “The Office.” One problem: These strategies are reactionary and irrelevant long-term. To cultivate the office of the future, companies need to acknowledge three truths about the modern workplace that existed even before COVID-19: Read Full Story

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How the pandemic’s push toward remote work could end the motherhood penalty

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Instead of putting their careers on hold to start families, women can maintain their professional momentum by exploring flexible work-from-home opportunities. In the five years after I graduated from business school, I was excited to watch my close friends and peers—many of whom were smart and ambitious women—launch companies and ascend to senior-level executive roles. Ultimately, a good number of these women dropped out of the workforce to raise children. Read Full Story

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‘Never let a crisis go to waste’: How 3 CEOs helped their companies thrive in a pandemic

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By leaning into innovation and technology, these companies are in a strong position even as the pandemic worsens. The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted different responses from company CEOs seeking to ensure their businesses survive. Keeping their employees safe has been the first priority, but beyond that, their task has involved understanding the situation, launching countermeasures, and trying to evolve ways of working to ensure their businesses can continue. Read Full Story

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The office as you know it is gone

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People like flexible work schedules. Plus, the tangible benefits of contemporary offices—socialization, physical proximity to colleagues—don’t require workers to go to the office every day from 9 to 5. The future of the office has become an open question after the coronavirus lockdown forced tens of millions of Americans to work from home. Will office workers flock back to their cubicles and water coolers when the pandemic ends? Or will employees want to hold on to their newfound freedom and flexibility, while employers eye the lower costs of the lack of a physical footprint? At least a few companies have already answered this question: Twitter, for example, says most of its employees can continue working from home forever, making the office merely a place to meet clients. We asked three scholars to weigh in on the future of the office. Read Full Story

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