41 states have reduced their carbon emissions while growing their economies

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It’s possible for the U.S. to decouple emissions growth from economic growth. The U.S. needs a massive economic boost to recover from the coronavirus crisis, but how that boost happens will be crucial not just to the economy, but to the climate. A green COVID-19 recovery will create jobs and make the country even more resilient against a volatile future. This might sound like an impossible demand to put on the much-needed recovery, but in recent years most states have already shown that this is economically possible. Since 2005, 41 states and Washington, D.C., have increased their GDPs while reducing their carbon emissions, debunking the myth that economic growth can only happen at the expense of our environment. Read Full Story

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Hitting net zero by 2050 could add $1 trillion to the U.S. economy

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The upfront investments in a clean economy will reap enormous economic rewards in the future. To avoid catastrophic climate change, the U.S. needs to reach net-zero emissions by 2050, meaning that emissions shrink so much that whatever’s left can be offset by nature or by technology such as machines that can suck CO2 out of the atmosphere. A new report from the nonprofit Energy Innovation says that the goal is possible—and reaching it comes with other benefits, most notably adding nearly $1 trillion to the GDP. Read Full Story

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The U.S. economy is reliant on consumer spending—can it survive a pandemic?

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How did the U.S. arrive at the point where mass consumption—and the greenhouse gas emissions associated with it—is necessary for economic and social well-being? The COVID-19 pandemic has radically affected the American economy, reducing spending by American households on materials goods, air travel, leisure activities, as well as the use of automobiles. As a result, greenhouse gas emissions have temporarily fallen dramatically . Read Full Story

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Even during COVID-19, states, cities, and businesses are making progress on a climate-friendly future

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Continued ambitious climate action by U.S. entities could reduce emissions up to 37% by 2030. Despite the brief respite from emissions caused by COVID-19 lockdowns, it hasn’t been clear whether the pandemic will actually set the world on course to a more climate-friendly future. There’s the issue of disposable personal protective equipment polluting the oceans , the rise in single-use plastics amid coronavirus fears, and the concern that car traffic will increase as people avoid public transit. More broadly, there’s the risk that policy leaders will double down on fossil fuels as part of our economic recovery, rather than divest from them. Read Full Story

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Wood buildings should be a requirement of any climate change policy

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A new meta-study offers the strongest evidence yet that timber buildings can drastically reduce carbon emissions in the construction industry. It’s not as visibly bad as the belching smokestacks of the coal industry or the gas-chugging backups on suburban highways, but the building industry is a major contributor to climate change. From their materials to their construction to their energy needs over time, buildings generate nearly 40% of global greenhouse gas emissions . Of that, around a quarter is embodied carbon, or the sum of emissions that resulted in the production, transportation, and use of building materials. What a building is made of can have a huge climate impact. Read Full Story

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This software can track a company’s carbon emissions in real time

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Emitwise wants to develop “a QuickBooks for carbon.” Calculating all of the carbon emissions for a company—from the electricity used by suppliers to airplane flights taken by employees to the hundreds of other energy uses that happen on any day of operations—is typically a slow and labor-intensive process. But a new software platform makes it possible for companies to track their emissions automatically instead, in real time. Read Full Story

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Want to actually fix the environment? Change how buildings are built

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We must decarbonize our buildings; our future depends on it, writes a consortium of architects, activists, and thought leaders. It’s official: The United States is recommitting to dramatically reducing greenhouse gas emissions and capping global warming under 1.5ºC. In doing so, the federal government now rejoins nearly 4,000 U.S. businesses, cities, counties, states, and tribes that declared “We’re Still In” following the United States’s previous withdrawal from the agreement. So how do we make progress while also managing through a global pandemic? We need to talk about buildings. Read Full Story

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COVID-19 lockdowns have led to a 17% drop in daily CO2 emissions

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The recovery can try to make structural changes to preserve these gains without economic devastation—or we can just go back to normal. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced countries around the world into lockdowns, and such halts have led to a 17% drop in daily global CO2 emissions—or 17 million tonnes of carbon dioxide each day—during the peak of coronavirus confinement measures in early April. But without structural changes in our economic, transportation, and energy systems, researchers warn that the lower emissions are unlikely to last. Read Full Story

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President Biden, appoint a fashion czar!

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The fashion industry is responsible for 10% of the world’s carbon emissions. It needs to be regulated like other big sectors. President Biden, while your administration is hard at work tackling emissions from the automobile and energy industries, there seem no plans to regulate fashion, which produces 10% of global carbon emissions. American fashion companies are also responsible for a panoply of human rights violations, from COVID-19 outbreaks in factories to relying on slave labor . You have an opportunity to take on this deeply problematic sector by creating a new White House position: It’s time to appoint a Fashion Czar. Read Full Story

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Key insights: Consumer trust segmented, the power of push notifications, martech stacks lack strategy, and more

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30-second summary: Healthcare and educational institutes win consumer trust while media and government struggle March saw push notifications reach their highest direct open rates and 32% of website visits were through these mobile app push notifications Mobile remains the best way to engage people with push notifications DemandLab’s recent ‘Martech stack optimization survey’ reveals that 53% of marketing leaders have no plan in place for their martech stacks Deals have shown a positive graph, Australia and Germany are opening up their economies due to some relief from the COVID-19 hit Conviva study segments streaming behavior across regions and devices – TV, PC, live streaming, and video on demand Standard ads vs COVID-19 based ads, what performed better? More on what CMOs’ immediate budget actions should be Information is power and mental health is key. In light of current events, we took the onus to save you the effort and have …

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