4 surprising ways Biden’s election could transform Silicon Valley

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A divided government likely benefits the tech industry, but it’s not all good news. Entrepreneur Bradley Tusk considers Silicon Valley’s future under a Biden administration. Nothing’s official, but as the election dust settles, it seems safe to assume that Joe Biden will be the next President of the United States. And while control of the Senate likely won’t be decided until the outcome of two runoffs elections in early January, odds are that the Republicans maintain their majority, leaving us with a divided Congress. Read Full Story

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Would a Democratic sweep help or hurt Silicon Valley?

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And what if Prop 22 fails? Entrepreneur Bradley Tusk games out the consequences of each 2020 election scenario. There’s just two weeks left until Election Day, and the polling currently has Joe Biden as the overwhelming favorite to take back the White House. Democrats look likely to retake the Senate, too. But if we’ve learned one thing about 2020, it’s that anything can happen—and you better believe that Silicon Valley lobbyists are planning for every potential eventuality. Depending on who wins the White House, the Senate, and what happens in local elections around the country, the impact on tech could vary wildly. Here’s a primer on what to expect with each possible outcome. Read Full Story

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Silicon Valley expects a chillier relationship with Biden than Obama

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Times have changed since the Obama administration did little to regulate the tech industry. “I’ve never been a big Zuckerberg fan,” says Biden. Now that the Biden administration has announced a transition team and is gradually announcing key advisory and cabinet appointments, the posture of the new administration toward Silicon Valley is becoming clearer. And it’s not the look of a budding friendship. Read Full Story

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What a Biden-Harris administration might mean for AI’s future

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The Democratic VP nominee has shown an interest in how AI and facial recognition can open the door to bias. Here’s what Joe Biden and Kamala Harris’s AI regulation strategy should consider. If the Biden-Harris ticket wins in November, it will mark the first time that a sitting vice president is a digital native. Not only did Kamala Harris grow up digital, but she’s also spent much of her adult life in and around Silicon Valley, and her statewide campaigns have been backed by some of Silicon Valley’s top Democratic power brokers, including Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, and Marc Benioff, chief executive of Salesforce. Read Full Story

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Memo to Silicon Valley: Here’s what ‘blitzscaling’ looks like in the nonprofit world

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Stop asking us to follow in the footsteps of private sector unicorns. For us, impact at scale looks very different, write two nonprofit CEOs. Funders and stakeholders constantly exhort nonprofit leaders like us to “10x or 100x” our programs to serve more people. Look to Silicon Valley, they urge, for lessons on “blitzscaling” and driving “hockey stick” growth. How can you take a page, they ask us, from unicorns like Uber and Airbnb, to exponentially scale from startups to market leaders that redefined their markets? Read Full Story

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Biden picked an ex-VC to run Commerce. Her ties to tech might be too close

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As governor of Rhode Island, she brought in Salesforce to deal with the pandemic. Will she get tough on Silicon Valley when warranted? Rhode Island governor Gina Raimondo, the Biden administration’s nominee for Commerce Secretary , once worked as a venture capitalist and has been friendly with the tech world. These affinities are seen by some in Washington as strengths, and others as liabilities. Either way, they’re bound to shape the way she runs the Department of Commerce. Read Full Story

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The U.S. is more divided than ever. Your business could be the bridge

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A strategist and former political adviser counsels companies to listen to consumers, stay true to their values, and find common ground. President-elect Joe Biden is expected to call for unity in his inaugural address on Wednesday, but he faces an uphill battle: America is more politically divided as at any time in our nation’s history. In November Biden received 81 million votes, seven million more votes than his opponent, Donald Trump. Despite Biden’s victory, a vocal minority of citizens have refused to acknowledge his win, culminating in the storming of the United States Capitol on January 6 (an act, in my opinion, of domestic terrorism). Read Full Story

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