2020 was the first-ever presidential election where people cast votes via smartphone

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Security concerns abound about mobile voting company Voatz. But election officials who use them say they’re no riskier than the current methods we use for some special cases of voting. Vance Woolley, a resident of Saratoga Springs in the Utah Valley, was suddenly called to a family emergency in Texas right before Election Day. He’d planned to have his family’s ballots Fed-Exed over (Utah largely votes by mail), but they didn’t arrive by the time the morning of November 3 rolled in. He called Utah County’s election office, and they swiftly offered them a simple contingency: They could vote using their smartphones. Read Full Story

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Your phone already tracks your location. Now that data could fight voter suppression

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A new initiative will aggregate smartphone location data so that researchers can understand the impact of long lines and limited polling places on Election Day. Smartphone location data is a dream for marketers who want to know where you go and how long you spend there—and a privacy nightmare . But this kind of geolocation data could also be used to protect people’s voting rights on Election Day. Read Full Story

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Top 5 ads that could persuade your pro-Trump uncle to vote Democrat

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From military patriotism and parenthood to science and dogs, we’ve got it all. Politics, and in particular elections, are all about persuasion. What can you say, and how can you frame it, to convince people to follow you? Or at least convince them to not follow the other candidate? Plenty of ads are aimed at firing up the base, getting people already on board extra-super-special excited, maybe excited enough to donate money or volunteer for the campaign. Maybe excited enough to talk to friends and family about considering to vote for you. Read Full Story

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Report: Trump Facebook campaign tried to deter Black voters in 2016 suppression effort

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Trump’s data science team profiled mainly Black and minority voters and used the detailed data to target them with ads to convince them not to vote. The election victory of political novice Donald Trump in 2016 resulted from a confluence of factors, including Russian disinformation, nationalist political winds, anger at “establishment” politicians, low voter turnout, and the rise of social media as a primary source of news and political messaging. One of the main ingredients in the Trump campaign’s (and the Russian GRU’s) recipe for winning was using social media—primarily Facebook—to convince people not to vote at all. Read Full Story

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Election Day needs to be a federal holiday because it’s good for business

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The CEO of Pipeline Equity was one of the early signatories of Time to Vote. She says, “Supporting a federal Election Day holiday presents one avenue for businesses to show up for their employees.” The only presidential election I didn’t vote in was in 1996. The poll lines stretched around the block, and I was stressed about being late for work. I carry the guilt of not voting in that election to this day. My father, a Hungarian refugee, had risked his life to ensure my existential right to vote. To use my voice to make a choice. Read Full Story

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Here’s why Brooklyn Decker, Amy Schumer, and dozens of powerful women are wearing pink suits

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Hillary Clinton and Kamala Harris’s favorite suit maker, Argent, is partnering with nonprofit Supermajority to get out the vote. Dozens of famous women are joining the cause. If you follow strong women on Instagram, your feed is probably packed with them wearing a bright pink suit. They’ve been spotted on powerful women across industries, including model Brooklyn Decker, comedian Amy Schumer, Black Lives Matter cofounder Alicia Garza, and dozens of others. In the run-up to the election—with Kamala Harris on the Democratic ticket—these women are using their platforms to champion female ambition in a new campaign called Ambition Suits You. Read Full Story

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A simple solution to safe pandemic voting: Close streets to let people vote outside

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A new guide helps cities understand how to best use space to maximize distance and speed on Election Day. A record number of people have already voted in the U.S. presidential election—more than 8 million Americans had voted by October 9, more than 50 times above the number that had voted by the same point in 2016. But even as many states push for voting by mail as a safe alternative in a pandemic, it’s possible that in-person voting could surge on Election Day, with many voters questioning mismanagement of the Postal Service or if their ballots will get thrown out on a technicality. If it looks anything like what happened in some state primaries , people might have to wait in line for hours. Read Full Story

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Joe Biden widens electoral vote lead against Donald Trump in decisive presidential race

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With Georgia added to his tally, Biden would have 306 electoral votes compared to Trump’s 232. President-elect Joe Biden widened his electoral vote lead against incumbent President Donald Trump on Friday after multiple decision desks called the state of Georgia in his favor. NBC News, CNN, and The New York Times made the call with projections that would add the state’s 16 electoral votes to the former vice president’s tally, giving him a total of 306 compared to Trump’s 232. Read Full Story

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Patagonia CEO calls on U.S. business leaders to act on restrictive voting laws

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Ryan Gellert outlines three steps American CEOs should take immediately to help protect democracy. Patagonia CEO Ryan Gellert is calling on CEOs and business leaders across America to not just speak out, but act up to protect democracy from restrictive voting laws like the election bill that passed last month in Georgia. Forty-seven states have already introduced 361 bills this year that would restrict voting rights. Read Full Story

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