2019 was the second largest year ever for corporate solar investments

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While big names such as Facebook and Walmart are putting massive amounts of money into solar, two-thirds of all of 2019’s newly installed solar capacity came from companies that are not in the Fortune 500. Throughout 2019, tech companies such as Apple and Facebook, retailers such as Walmart and Target, and other corporations from real estate companies to banks installed a combined 1,283 megawatts of new commercial solar capacity in the United States—enough to power more than 243,000 homes. Read Full Story

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This game-changing solar company recycles old panels into new ones

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The first wave of solar panels is reaching the end of their useful lives. Now they can become new solar panels instead of trash. The global surge in solar power is helping quickly lower the cost of solar panels and shrink energy’s carbon footprint, with around 70,000 solar panels being installed every hour by 2018, and an estimated 1.47 million solar panels in place by that year in the U.S. alone. But it also means that we’ll face an enormous pile of e-waste when those panels eventually wear out. Read Full Story

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How the public perception of CEOs has shifted during the pandemic

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Jeff Bezos is down. Walmart CEO Doug McMillon is up. As the coronavirus has radically reshaped the economy, some companies have adapted better than others—and some CEOs have performed better as leaders. A new ranking from SJR, a corporate communications firm, compares the public perception of CEOs based on an analysis of millions of social media posts and articles, and it compares how leaders were seen both immediately before COVID-19 was declared a global pandemic and in the six weeks afterward. Read Full Story

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How Walmart+, Target Shipt, and Instacart Express stack up against Prime

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In the COVID era, it’s all about delivery—and Target, Walmart, and others are coming for Amazon’s share of the market. Since Amazon Prime debuted in 2005, retailers have been scrambling to match its convenience—but never more urgently than during the pandemic, as consumers moved to shopping online. In September, Walmart introduced Walmart+, a membership that offers same-day delivery using stores as hubs. Target purchased delivery service Shipt in 2017 and rolled it out at its 1,800 locations, plus other retail partners. In 2019, e-commerce logistics company Shopify debuted a $1 billion fulfillment network to give merchants two-day shipping capability. Read Full Story

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1 in 12 Fortune 500 Companies Are Using TikTok

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Fewer Fortune 500 companies are using social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram this year than did last year. However, their use of public-facing corporate blogs has increased, and some have even started using TikTok, according to the latest annual analysis of Fortune 500 corporate social media usage from the University of Massachusetts… Read More » The post 1 in 12 Fortune 500 Companies Are Using TikTok appeared first on Marketing Charts .

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How Tommy Hilfiger is working toward a more sustainable and inclusive fashion industry

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From a massive solar roof to new equity programs to washing denim with lasers instead of water. On the roof of Tommy Hilfiger’s European distribution center—located in the Dutch town of Venlo—are 48,000 solar panels, just one of the latest steps the fashion brand has taken to be more sustainable. CEO Martijn Hagman announced the completion of the solar panel roof at the Fast Company Innovation Festival on Tuesday, saying the company believes it’s “one of the most powerful solar roofs in the world at this moment.” Read Full Story

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What Facebook users need to know about the company’s end-to-end encryption plans

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It’s definitely complicated, but here’s why Facebook is pursuing it, how it benefits you, why it’s risky, and why it matters. As Facebook seeks to integrate its four mega apps —Instagram, WhatsApp, Messenger, and Facebook itself—one of the key aspects of that effort will ultimately be adding end-to-end encryption for all of them and allowing them to interoperate. Currently, only WhatsApp has end-to-end encryption by default, and Messenger merely offers it as an opt-in option within each conversation you have. “People’s private communications should be secure,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote in his March 2019 memo outlining his vision. “End-to-end encryption prevents anyone—including us—from seeing what people share on our services.” Read Full Story

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Walmart says it will reach zero emissions by 2040—without using any offsets

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Corporate climate commitments often involve paying into environmental projects to make up for an inability to truly achieve a clean footprint. The retail giant just set the bar higher. When companies set targets to get to zero emissions, they often aim for “net zero,” using carbon-offset projects like tree planting to make up for the fact that they haven’t fully stopped polluting. A new goal from Walmart goes further: By 2040, the company plans to reach zero emissions across its global operations without using any offsets. In other words, it’s aiming for real zero, not net zero. Read Full Story

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Spain wants to make it easy for any company to shift to a four-day workweek

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A new proposal would offer government grants to companies that give employees an extra day off a week, which could help give the revolutionary idea more global momentum. The four-day week is starting to move from fantasy to the mainstream: Unilever, the massive corporation that owns brands such as Dove and Ben and Jerry’s, is now testing a shorter workweek with employees in New Zealand, who will be paid for five days while working four. Microsoft ran a similar pilot in Japan in 2019, giving employees Fridays off, and saw productivity grow by 40% despite the fact that workers spent less time in the office. Now, the Spanish government is considering a proposal that would incentivize companies across the country to shorten working hours without a cut in pay. Read Full Story

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